WITSA Inventory on IT

Skills and Workforce Initiatives

 
2001
 
Interim Compilation
April 3, 2001

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8300 Boone Boulevard, Suite 450. Vienna, VA 22182 USA

Tel. +1 703 288-1425    Fax. +1 617 687-6590

E-mail: ahalvorsen@ITAA.org  URL: http://www.witsa.org


The World Information Technology and Services Alliance

2001 Inventory on IT Skills and Workforce Initiatives

 

Contents

 

Foreword

About WITSA

IT Associations Contributing to the Inventory

 

Studies, Reports & Surveys

AUSTRALIA

1.       Future Demand for IT&T Skills in Australia 1999 –2004

2.       Reality Bites

3.       Skills X Knowledge = Growth

4.       School Teacher Demand and Supply: Primary and Secondary

5.       Unmet Demand for Information Technology and Telecommunication Courses

AUSTRIA

1.       WIFO-STUDY on ICT-Gap in Austria (2000)

2.       IDC-Study on the ICT-Gap in Austria (2000)

BELGIUM

1.       Salary Survey 2000 (annual)

2.       Economic Survey of Belgian ITC Services 2000

CANADA

1.       Labour Market Trends for Computer Professionals in Canada

2.       Brain drain and brain gain: The migration of knowledge workers from and to Canada

3.       Stepping Up: Skills and Opportunities in the Knowledge Economy

EU

1.       EITO study on ICT market in Europe. Contains analysis of the skills shortage

2.       Paper delivered by Marie Donnelly, Head of Unit, Knowledge Society, DG Employment and Social Affairs

FINLAND

1.       Growth Strategy and Challenges for the Finnish Software Industry 67/99

2.       Need of Employees in the IT Services Sector

3.       Electronic and Electrical Business in Finland 1997-2002

HONG KONG

1.       1999 Survey of the Management Competency and Management Training Needs of Managers and Supervisors

INDIA

1.       NASSCOM-McKinsey Report 1999

2.       The IT Software and Services Industry in India: A Strategic Review 2001

ITALY

1.   Indagine Retributiva ASSINTEL

JAPAN

1.       Study on Workforce Strategy in IT Industry

2.       Survey on IT Engineers' View of Occupation and Incentives

3.       Survey Report on Employment by SMEs in IT Industry in Tokyo Metropolitan Area

4.       Rate of IT service companies feeling personnel shortage

 

MEXICO

1.       Perspectivas del Mercado Laboral en la Industria de Tecnología en México

NETHERLANDS

1.       ICT Marktmonitor™ 2000-2001

NORTHERN IRELAND

1.       Software Industry Federation – Survey 2000

2.       IT’s the future

3.       The Way Forward

4.       A study of the Northern Ireland Labour Market for IT skills

5.       The IT Skills Forecasting Study: Labour Market Bulletin 14

NORWAY

1.       Value Creation in Norway

SINGAPORE

1.       Infocomm Manpower & Skills Survey

SOUTH AFRICA

2.       South African IT Industry Strategy Project (SAITIS)

3.       Report by the Information Systems, Electronics & Telecommunications Technologies Sector Education & Training Authority (ISETT SETA)

SWEDEN

1.       SITO’s Program for IT Skills 2001

UK

1.       Stevens report: Final report from the ITCE skills strategy group – skills for the information age

USA

1.       Bridging the Gap: Information Technology Skills for a New Millennium

2.       The Digital Workforce: Building Infotech Skills at the Speed of Innovation

3.       Building a Workforce for the Information Economy

4.       A Nation of Opportunity: Building Americas 21st Century Workforce

5.       Falling Through the Net: Toward Digital Inclusion

6.       The American Workforce in the New Millennium: The Growing Demand for Skills

 

Initiatives

AUSTRALIA

1.       Skills Exchange

2.       MCEETYA Ministers Joint Statement on Education and Training in the Information Economy

3.       Learning for the knowledge society

AUSTRIA

1.       Local Initiative: Qualification Dialogue of the City of Vienna

1.       Sectoral Qualifying Initiative of the Electronic Industry

BELGIUM

1.       ROAD SHOW

CANADA

1.       Facilitated Processing for Information Technology Workers

2.       Canada Foundation for Innovation

3.       Mapping IT Labour Market

4.       Selective Investment in IT-related Post-secondary Programs – Ontario Access to Opportunities Program (ATOP)

5.       Private and private/public postgraduate programs in IT

6.       International Computer Driving License (ICDL)

CHINESE TAIPEI

1.       IT Professional Training Enhancement Program

EU

1.       EU High Level Task-Force on Skills and Mobility

2.       The IT Skills Gap – EU Action Points for the 2001 Stockholm Summit

3.       Mobility; Europe of Knowledge initiative

4.       Common European format for curricula vitae

5.       More uniform, transparent and flexible EU regime for recognition of professional qualifications

6.       Have you got what it takes? Project Gemini – Improving the availability of graduates to the IT services industry

FINLAND

1.       TIDE (Tietoteollisuuden ja digitaalisen median osaamisen ennakointi)

INDIA

1.       Special Taskforce on Human Resource Development set up by the Government of India under the Ministry of Human Resource Development

2.       Setting up of Indian Institute of Information Technology (IIIT)

ITALY

1.   Assintel Iniziative

JAPAN

1.   Asian Common Skill Standard Initiative for IT Engineers

MEXICO

1.       Joint Public and Private Committee Review of IT Education

NORTHERN IRELAND

1.       Rapid Advancement Programme (RAP)

2.       Relevant Experience and Computer Training (REaCT)

3.       Business Strategy (BSP) and Business Awareness (BAP) Programmes

4.       Investors in People – group scheme

5.       Millennium Leap

NORWAY

1.       Rise in education of IT-specialists in Norway

2.       Opening up of importing IT-specialists from countries outside EU

SINGAPORE

1.       IDA Manpower Development

SOUTH AFRICA

2.       Skills Development Act and Skills Development Levies Act

SWEDEN

1.       SwIT – Training for Jobs in IT; a Platform for Growth

UK

1.       E-skills NTO strategic plan

2.       Skills Framework for the Information Age

3.       E-skills into Business

4.       CSSA Skills Advisory Board

5.       Employers charter

USA

1.       The National Skills Standard Board

2.       The Techforce Initiative

3.        The Career Cluster Initiative

 


 

Foreword

 

The Internet and IT have become the twin pistons of the economy in countries across the world. The demand for IT workers is large and growing. WITSA believes workforce related barriers constitute a growing predicament to the growth of IT and the high-tech industry. WITSA has undertaken this “inventory” of existing studies, reports and surveys conducted in the respective WITSA countries, which is hoped helpful to obtain a thorough overview about what has been done on this critical issue across the world. It does not provide new research, nor does it purport to take issue with the controversy over classification of what constitutes “IT workers” (e.g. should blue collar workers –such as ‘digital image setters’- be included?). Nevertheless, it is hoped that the findings will provide a useful tool to establish best practices, recommendations and other remedies to the barriers caused by the growing skills gap.

 

About WITSA

The World Information Technology and Services Alliance (WITSA) is a consortium of information technology (IT) industry associations from economies around the world. As the global voice of the IT industry, WITSA is dedicated to:

 

q       advocating policies that advance the industry’s growth and development;

q       facilitating international trade and investment in IT products and services;

q       strengthening WITSA’s national industry associations through the sharing of knowledge, experience, and critical information;

q       providing members with a vast network of contacts in nearly every geographic region of the world;

q       hosting the World Congress on IT, the only industry sponsored global IT event;

q       hosting the Global Public Policy Conference; and

q       hosting the Global Information Security Summit.

 

Founded in 1978 and originally known as the World Computing Services Industry Association, WITSA has increasingly assumed an active advocacy role in international public policy issues affecting the creation of a robust global information infrastructure, including:

 

q       increasing competition through open markets and regulatory reform;

q       protecting intellectual property;

q       encouraging cross-industry and government cooperation to enhance information security;

q       bridging the education and skills gap

q       reducing tariff and non-tariff trade barriers to IT goods and services; and

q       safeguarding the viability and continued growth of the Internet and electronic commerce.

 

WITSA has a real impact on the global IT environment. It strengthens the industry at large by promoting a level playing field and by voicing the concerns of the international IT community in multilateral organizations, including the World Trade Organization (WTO), the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, the G-8 and other international fora where policies affecting industry interests are developed. WITSA recently issued statements on the WTO Agreement on Basic Telecommunications Services, the Year 2000, and electronic commerce. Additional WITSA reports and statements can be found at http://www.witsa.org/papers/.


IT Associations Contributing to the Inventory

Australia                     Australian Information Industry Association (AIIA)

URL: http://www.aiia.com.au/ E-mail: aiia@aiia.com.au

Austria                        Federation for the Information Industry in Austria (VIW)

URL: http://www.viw.or.at/ E-mail:  gkwagner@via.at

Canada                        Information Technology Association of Canada (ITAC)

URL: http://www.itac.ca/ E-mail: info@itac.ca

Chinese Taipei           Information Service Industry Association of Chinese Taipei (CISA)

URL: http://www.cisanet.org.tw/english/index.html / cisa@mail.cisanet.org.tw

Belgium                      Informatic Services Association, Belgium (INSEA)

URL: http://www.insea.be/index.htm / E-mail: info@insea.be

Finland                        Information Technology Services Association (Tietotekniikan Palveluliitto - TIPAL) URL: http://www.tipal.fi/index.html E-mail: tipal@tipal.fi

Hong Kong                 Hong Kong Information Technology Federation (HKITF)

URL: http://www.hkitf.org.hk/ E-mail: Edward@abc.com.hk

India                            National Association of Software and Service Companies (NASSCOM)

URL: http://www.nasscom.org/ E-mail: nasscom@nasscom.org

Italy                             Associazone Nazionale Imprese Servizi Informatica Telematica Robotica Eidomatica (ASSINTEL) assintel@assintel.it / http://www.assintel.it

Japan                           Japan Information Service Industry Association (JISA)

URL: http://www.jisa.or.jp/ E-mail: info@jisa.or.jp

Mexico                        Asociación Mexicana de la Industria de Tecnologías de Información (AMITI)

AMITI: http://www.amiti.org.mx/ E-mail: amiti@spin.com.mx/

Netherlands                Federation of Dutch Branch Associations in Information Technology (Federatie Nederlandse IT - FENIT) URL: http://www.fenit.nl/ E-mail: bureau@fenit.nl

Northern Ireland        Software Industry Federation in Northern Ireland (SIF)

                                    URL: http://www.sif.co.uk E-mail: billy@sif.co.uk

Norway                        ICT Norway (IKT Norge) / http://www.ikt-norge.no/ E-mail: bt@ikt-norge.no

Singapore                    Singapore Information Technology Federation (SITF)

URL: www.sitf.org.sg E-mail: sitf@sitf.org.sg

South Africa                Information Industry South Africa (IISA)

                                    URL: http://www.ita.org.za E-mail: ita@ita.org.za

Spain                           Asociación Española de Empresas de Tecnologías de la Información (SEDISI)

URL: http://www.sedisi.es E-mail: info@sedisi.es

Sweden                        Swedish IT-companies' Organisation AB (Svenska IT-Företagens Organisation AB) URL: http://www.sito.se/ E-mail: info@sito.se

United Kingdom         Computing Services & Software Association (CSSA)

URL: http://www.cssa.co.uk/cssa/ E-mail: cssa@cssa.co.uk

United States              Information Technology Association of America (ITAA)

URL: http://www.itaa.org/index.htm E-mail: jmcwilliams@itaa.org

 


 

STUDIES, REPORTS & SURVEYS

 

This section encompasses all studies, reports and surveys which address the growing IT skills gap in WITSA member countries and regions that have been published during the last two to three years (or earlier, if still relevant). These are publications published or conducted by WITSA member organizations, private companies, academic organizations, government agencies, or news/media outlets. Some international studies and reports are also included.

 

 

Australia

 

1. Future Demand for IT&T Skills in Australia 1999 -2004

______________________________________________________________________

Scope of Study/Report/Survey and brief summary of findings

The IT&T industry in Australia has adopted a strategy to avert a looming skills crisis within Australia. The shortage of skills is a global one which, if left unaddressed, has the potential to constrain Australia's national development. The IT&T Skills Task Force believes there is a role for collective action in meeting the skills challenge which would complement the training needs and efforts of individual companies.

In order to quantify the extent of any skill shortage affecting the Australian IT&T industry, the IT&T Skills Task Force decided to commission work to identify Australia's short-term and long-term demand needs for IT&T skills.

Over April and May 1999, Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu, on behalf of the IT&T SkillsTask Force, carried out the most comprehensive survey to date of Australia's IT&T skills. The survey covered all leading suppliers of IT&T products and services as well as some of Australia's major users of those services. Responses were received from organisations employing over a quarter of a million people in total and more than 55,000 specialist IT&T employees. Respondents to the survey represented a wide cross-section by employment size, by sector and by type of IT&T activity.

It is estimated that there are currently around 360,000 people primarily engaged in IT&T activity in Australia. IT&T employees account for 4.2% of the total Australian workforce.

 

Date of Publication:  May 1999

 

How a Copy of the Study/Report/Survey Can be Obtained (URL, contact):

http://www.aiia.com.au/education

 


Australia

 

2. Reality Bites

______________________________________________________________________

Scope of Study/Report/Survey and brief summary of findings

·        Key findings of the report are that:

·        Young people believe that studying technology limits their career  options

·        Young people are generally not motivated by high salaries in the I.T. industry;

·        Young people are motivated by opportunities to work overseas;

·        Careers in the I.T. industry are more attractive to young people from lower socio-economic groups; and

·        Regional students have a clearer idea of the careers they want to pursue than those in metropolitan areas.

 

Publication Date / Organization that Conducted Research:

February 2001/Multimedia Victoria – Government agency

 

Available in these Languages: English

 

How a Copy of the Study/Report/Survey Can be Obtained (URL, contact):

http://www.mmv.vic.gov.au.

 

 

3. Skills X Knowledge = Growth

______________________________________________________________________

Scope of Study/Report/Survey and brief summary of findings

Victorian Government's blueprint for promoting growth in Victoria through the  development of ICT skills and knowledge

 

Publication Date / Organization that Conducted Research:

December 2000 / Multimedia Victoria

 

Available in these Languages: English

 

How a Copy of the Study/Report/Survey Can be Obtained (URL, contact):

http://www.mmv.vic.gov.au

 


Australia

 

4. School Teacher Demand and Supply: Primary and Secondary

______________________________________________________________________

Scope of Study/Report/Survey and brief summary of findings

In accordance with a decision by Ministers at the 6th MCEETYA Meeting  (Melbourne, 1997), the Conference of Education Systems Chief Executive Officers (CESCEO) have put into place procedures to enable annual monitoring and reporting on the labor market for teachers. This paper  is the first of these reports that CESCEO proposes to produce biennially. The report indicates that some specializations of secondary school teachers have experienced recruitment difficulties in some States from at least the early 1990s, while primary school teachers have generally not been in shortage. The paper also examines the outlook for primary and  secondary teachers over a five-year period using 1997 as a base. At present difficulties in recruiting teachers are limited mainly to particular specializations of secondary teachers, including Languages Other Than English (LOTE), physical education and mathematics/science. The average age of primary and secondary teachers has risen in recent years, contributing to concerns about increased recruiting difficulties in the next few years. A decline in the number of students completing relevant higher education courses during the 1990s has added to these concerns.

 

Publication Date / Organization that Conducted Research:

July 1998 / Published by: MCEETYA (Prepared by CESCEO National Teacher Supply and Demand Working Party)

Available in these Languages: English

See a Copy: http://www.curriculum.edu.au/mceetya/public/pub342.htm

 

5. Unmet Demand for Information Technology and Telecommunication Courses

______________________________________________________________________

Scope of Study/Report/Survey and brief summary of findings

Education and Skill formation: unmet demand for Information technology and Telecommunications courses presents the findings of a study conducted by South Australian Centre for Economic Studies on behalf of DETYA. The project examined the extent of unmet demand for Information Technology and Telecommunications (IT&T) courses in the tertiary sector;  how tertiary education institutions identify and plan for areas of emerging  skill needs;  and the types of relations developed between tertiary education institutions and industry to ensure that industry skill needs are well understood and met.

 

Publication Date / Organization that Conducted Research:

January 2001 / Department of Education, Training and Youth Affairs

Available in these Languages:  English

See a Copy: http://www.detya.gov.au/iae/documents/d_report.htm


Austria

 

1. WIFO-STUDY on ICT-Gap in Austria (2000)

______________________________________________________________________

Scope of Study/Report/Survey and brief summary of findings

Vienna is particularly affected by the IT skills shortage because more than 60% of the people employed in the media and telecommunications sector are concentrated in the capital. Altogether, the occupation of high-tech workers in the telecom and media sector will rise from approximately 58,300 in 1999 to 69.020 in 2003. In Vienna alone, the numbers will be 37.250 and 44.010. However, there will be an demand for an additional 13,000 (Austria) and 9,000 (Vienna) workers by 2003. The demand for IT workers will continue to grow in the future. The demand for qualified workers from the Telecom and media sector will continue to produce a structural strain on the job market. Concerns go beyond an increase in graduates, to the resources for continuous training, to keep existing workers current with technological progress. If the latter is not addressed, the dynamic nature of this sector is halted and overall economic growth is slowed. The study " work and qualification demand in the Telecom and media sector " was published in early May 2000 (40 pages, ATS 600 or EUR 43.60). Orders: WIFO, Christine Kautz, Tel. (+43 1) 798 26 01/282, fax (+43 1) 798 93 86, E-Mail Christine.Kautz@wifo.ac.at.

 

Publication Date / Organization that Conducted Research:

27. April 2000, No.149; Arbeits- und Qualifikationsnachfrage im Telekom- und Mediensektor, by WIFO (the Austrian Institute of Economic Research)

 

Available in these Languages: German

 

For further information: http://www.wifo.at/. April 27, 2000 Press release: Arbeits– und Qualifikationsnachfrage im Telekom– und Mediensektor. Contact Angelina.Keil@wifo.ac.at or Gerhard K. Wagner, General Secretary of VIW (Federation for the Information Industry in Austria): gkwagner@via.at.

 

 

2. IDC-Study on the ICT-Gap in Austria (2000)

______________________________________________________________________

Scope of Study/Report/Survey and brief summary of findings

 

Publication Date / Organization that Conducted Research:

April 2000: International Data Corporation (IDC).

 

Available in these Languages: German

 

For further information: http://www.idc.at/. Contact Gerhard K. Wagner, General Secretary of VIW (Federation for the Information Industry in Austria): gkwagner@via.at.


Belgium

 

1. Salary Survey 2000 (annual)

______________________________________________________________________

Scope of Study/Report/Survey and brief summary of findings

Annual shortage of about 5 000 software engineers in Belgium

 

Publication Date / Organization that Conducted Research:

October 2000 by INSEA, the Belgian Information Services Association.

 

Approximate Funding Amount: Salary Survey :  1 000 Euro

 

Available in these Languages: English

 

How a Copy of the Study/Report/Survey Can be Obtained (URL, contact):

By confirming your order at am@insea.be

Payment at BBL 310-0400557-33 (Belgium)

 

 

2. Economic Survey of Belgian ITC Services 2000

______________________________________________________________________

 

Scope of Study/Report/Survey and brief summary of findings

Annual shortage of about 5 000 software engineers in Belgium

 

Publication Date / Organization that Conducted Research:

January 2001 / INSEA, the Belgian Information Services Association.

 

Approximate Funding Amount:  Economic Survey :  1 250 Euro:  

 

Available in these Languages: English

 

How a Copy of the Study/Report/Survey Can be Obtained (URL, contact):

By confirming your order at am@insea.be

Payment at BBL 310-0400557-33 (Belgium)


Canada

 

1. Labour Market Trends for Computer Professionals in Canada

______________________________________________________________________

Scope of Study/Report/Survey and brief summary of findings: This report reviews trends in supply, demand, and salary rates in the labour market for computer professionals; and comments on labour market imbalances, both in general and for this specific market. Despite widespread industry claims, it appears that neither Canada nor the United States have experienced significant shortages for computer professionals. Labour markets will always have shortages or surpluses; the challenge is to assess the severity and consequences of these conditions and to improve the working of the markets.

 

Publication Date / Organization that Conducted Research:

June 1999 / Prepared for Sectoral and Occupational Studies Division

Human Resources Investment Branch Human Resources Development Canada

by David Stager University of Toronto

Available in these Languages: English and French

How a Copy of the Study/Report/Survey Can be Obtained (URL, contact):

http://www.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/arb/publications/research/1999docs/abr-99-4e.shtml

 

2. Brain drain and brain gain: The migration of knowledge workers from and to Canada

______________________________________________________________________

Scope of Study/Report/Survey and brief summary of findings: During the 1990s Canada suffered a net loss of skilled workers to the United States in several economically important occupations, although the numbers involved have remained small in an historical sense and small relative to the supply of workers in these occupations. Compared with the general population, emigrants are over-represented among better-educated, higher-income earners and individuals of prime working age. Further, there was an upward trend during the 1990s in the number of people leaving Canada for the United States and other countries. While losses of highly skilled workers to the United States accelerated during the 1990s, so too did the influx of highly skilled workers into Canada from the rest of the world. This is particularly true of high-technology industries where immigrant workers entering Canada outnumber the outflow to the United States by a wide margin. Emigrants to the United States are more than twice as likely to hold a university degree than are immigrants to Canada. However, because of the overall greater number of immigrants, there are four times as many university graduates entering Canada from the rest of the world as there are university degree holders of all levels leaving Canada for the United States. The number of master’s and doctoral graduates alone entering Canada from the rest of the world is equal to the number of university graduates at all levels leaving Canada for the United States.

 

Publication Date/Organization that Conducted Research: Spring 2000 / Statistics Canada

Available in these Languages: English and French

See a Copy: http://strategis.ic.gc.ca/sc_ecnmy/mera/engdoc/07.html


Canada

 

3. Stepping Up: Skills and Opportunities in the Knowledge Economy

______________________________________________________________________

Scope of Study/Report/Survey and brief summary of findings

Canada must create more opportunities for Canadians to put their skills to work

 

Publication Date / Organization that Conducted Research:

Spring 2000 / Advisory Council on Science and Technology

 

Available in these Languages: English and French

 

How a Copy of the Study/Report/Survey Can be Obtained (URL, contact):

http://www.looksmart.com/r?page=/search/frames/index.html&isp=US&name=&bcolor=ffcc00&key=expert+panel+on+skills&url=http%3a//acst%2dccst.gc.ca/acst/skills/home%5fe.html&pskip=&nskip=10&se=0,0,0,1000&index=1

 


EU

 

1. EITO study on ICT market in Europe. Contains analysis of the skills shortage

______________________________________________________________________

Scope of Study/Report/Survey and brief summary of findings

 

Information technology and telecommunications achieve double digit growth rates across Europe. Europe clearly in front compared with the U.S. and Japan. UK among European pace makers for additional growth in ICT. Skills shortage increases Europe-wide. 620,000 ICT and E-Business specialists will be lacking in the UK by 2003.

 

Publication Date / Organization that Conducted Research: 2/3/2001

 

Available in these Languages: English

 

How a Copy of the Study/Report/Survey Can be Obtained (URL, contact):

Summary and press release available by contacting Laurence Harrison at Laurence.Harrison@cssa.co.uk

 

2. Paper delivered by Marie Donnelly, Head of Unit, Knowledge Society, DG Employment and Social Affairs

______________________________________________________________________

Scope of Study/Report/Survey and brief summary of findings

 

Europe-wide analysis of the European Skills Shortage and current uptake.  Slides available.

 

Publication Date / Organization that Conducted Research: 27/2/2001

 

Available in these Languages:  English

 

How a Copy of the Study/Report/Survey Can be Obtained (URL, contact):

Summary and press release available by contacting Laurence Harrison at Laurence.Harrison@cssa.co.uk.  


Finland

 

1. Growth Strategy and Challenges for the Finnish Software Industry 67/99

______________________________________________________________________

Scope of Study/Report/Survey and brief summary of findings

Report describes the growth strategy for the Finnish software industry up to year 2010.

The report is connected with the development of collaboration between Finnish information technology centers of expertise together with companies and business development organizations have participated in this project which has received funding from the Ministry of Education. Brief summary of findings:

 

-         To develop the software product industry, people skilled in the multiple facets of the international business environment are needed.

-         Report recommends comprehensive training for company personnel in the development of business management and internationalization.

-         The Information Industry Program initiated by the Ministry of Education in 1998 is a good way to increase the number of trained personnel, but it is essential to further improve the availability of personnel during the next five years.

 

Publication Date / Organization that Conducted Research:

1999 / Tekes, the National Technology Agency (Teknologian Kehittämiskeskus)

 

Available in these Languages: Finnish

 

How a Copy of the Study/Report/Survey Can be Obtained: http://www.tekes.fi

 

2. Need of Employees in the IT Services Sector

______________________________________________________________________

Scope of Study/Report/Survey and brief summary of findings

Employers Confederation of Services Industry of Finland (Palvelutyönantajat ry) conducts once a year a survey of need for employees among its member companies.

Need of employees (IT Services Sector) in member companies in year 2000 was 5 000 persons. In 2001 it will be approximately 2 500 – 3 000 persons. The decline in number is due to the weak economical situation in the IT services sector. The companies have also increased the number of employees through buying new companies, in which case the increase and demand of employees does not show in the statistics. Also the difficulties in obtaining skilled specialist shows as lower estimates.

 

Publication Date /Organization that Conducted Research:  2000 /Palvelutyönantajat ry

 

Available in these Languages: Finnish

 

How a Copy of the Study/Report/Survey Can be Obtained:

http://www.palvelutyonantajat.fi /Mr. Mikko Martikainen


Finland

 

 

3. Electronic and Electrical Business in Finland 1997-2002

______________________________________________________________________

Scope of Study/Report/Survey and brief summary of findings

Automation technology review - Studies above mentioned sector including skills needed.

 

Publication Date / Organization that Conducted Research:

1997/ Technical Research center of FinlandVTT Automaatio

 

Available in these Languages: Finnish and English

 

How a Copy of the Study/Report/Survey Can be Obtained (URL, contact):

www.vtt.fi


India

 

 

1. NASSCOM-McKinsey Report 1999

______________________________________________________________________

Scope of Study/Report/Survey and brief summary of findings

This report details the future strategies of the Indian IT software and service industry and the steps that need to be taken if India has to emerge as a leading provider of IT software services. It has a special section on developing skilled base of knowledge workers.

 

Publication Date / Organization that Conducted Research:

December 1999 / McKinsey & Co

 

Approximate Funding Amount: US$200,000

 

Available in these Languages: English

 

How a Copy of the Study/Report/Survey Can be Obtained (URL, contact):

www.nasscom.org

 

 

2. The IT Software and Services Industry in India: A Strategic Review 2001

______________________________________________________________________

Scope of Study/Report/Survey and brief summary of findings

This report details the current statistics of India's software driven infotech industry, including details on e-commerce, internet, IT services, telecom software etc. It also contains details on NASSCOM's yearly survey on knowledge workers and initiatives that need to be taken to further develop the workforce.

 

Publication Date / Organization that conducted Research :

February 2001 / NASSCOM

  

Available in these Languages:  English

 

How a Copy of the Study/Report/Survey Can be Obtained (URL, contact): www.nasscom.org

 


Hong Kong

 

1. 1999 Survey of the Management Competency and Management Training Needs of Managers and Supervisors

______________________________________________________________________

Scope of Study/Report/Survey and brief summary of findings

The Committee on Management and Supervisory Training (CMST) conducted a sampled survey on companies employing ten or more people in the third quarter of 1999 to study the managerial competency and management development needs of managers and supervisors working in Hong Kong and the Mainland.

 

Based on the above findings, the Committee recommends employers, their human resource units and local training providers to incorporate core competencies into their management development programmes. For companies considering sponsoring their managers and supervisors to attend external programmes, they should o\look for ones that help build the specific core and deficient competencies of their respective sectors. The CMST is aware that for Hong Kong to maintain its competitiveness and succeed in the new millennium, organizations need to have their managers and supervisors well equipped for new skills and competencies.  In view of its impartial role, The Management Development Centre of Hong Kong (MDC) is encouraged to take initiative and play a more active role in liaising with local training providers and coordinating proposed collaborations. Training providers and the MDC are also urged to extend resources to promote the importance of management development in enabling companies to maintain their competitiveness, to innovate and to succeed, and to publicize the availability of different options in the market place.  Besides continuing on conducting large scale sampled surveys every few years, to closely monitor the fast changing environment and the resultant needs, the Committee will flexibly carry out smaller scale studies employing different methodologies as and when appropriate in the future.

 

Publication Date / Organization that Conducted Research:

Third Quarter, 1999 / The Committee on Management and Supervisory Training (CMST)

 

Available in these Languages: English and Chinese

 

How a Copy of the Study/Report/Survey Can be Obtained (URL, contact):

Ping Wong, Hong Kong Information Technology Federation LTD., at ping.wong@dots21.com.


Italy

 

1. Indagine Retributiva ASSINTEL

______________________________________________________________________

Name of Study, Report or Survey: INDAGINE RETRIBUTIVA ASSINTEL is a free yearly salary survey carried on by the Italian ICT Companies Association.

 

Scope of Study/Report/Survey and brief summary of findings

The aim of the survey is to have a picture of the salary & benefits trends, skill requirements, employees number grow…

 

Publication Date / Organization that Conducted Research:

March 30th 2001 / Assintel, Associazione Nazionale Imprese Servizi Informatica, Telematica, Robotica, Eidomatica

 

Approximate Funding Amount: The survey is carried on at no charge by the Association

 

Available in these Languages: Italian

 

How a Copy of the Study/Report/Survey Can be Obtained (URL, contact):

www.assintel.it.


Japan

 

1. Study on Workforce Strategy in IT Industry

______________________________________________________________________

Scope of study and brief summary of findings: The information service companies owe their competitiveness greatly to “human resources.” Especially, the human resources strategy as the backbone of the management, such as the employment of excellent human resources, fosterage of high value-added human resources, career management that raises motivation, flexible assignment and job rotation, is indispensable for the company to survive. However, there are big problems to be solved immediately; a problem of not having a clear strategy that can respond to a change of business contents and the labor market and a problem of rather small training expenses for fostering human resources compared with other industries and foreign companies. Now, we examine how the human resources strategy should be in the industry and summarize it as a proposal.

 

Brief findings: Many information service companies have problems of the personnel management; to obtain and keep excellent human resources, to foster high value-added human resources with market competitiveness, to carry out a flexible and appropriate assignment of human resources and rotation, and to structure the performance-linked labor costs management and the allocation system of total labor costs according to the individual business performance. A new strategy for human resources is necessary to solve these problems. We summarized the viewpoints of the necessary strategy at each stage of the human resources management as follows.

 

1) The Stage of Coordination between the Business Strategy and the Human Resources Strategy

Business Strategy: To formulate a business strategy that clears the advantage of the company and core-competence

Organizational Strategy, Strategy for Strengthening the Management Power: To clarify what kind of function and/or knowledge are necessary to implement that business strategy

Human Resources Strategy: The information service companies owe their competitiveness greatly to “human resources” and the human resources strategy concerning “employment” “fosterage” “exploitation” of people and “personnel and labor management” is important in the strategy for strengthening the management power.

 

2) The Stage of the Employment of Human Resources

Employment Strategy: To clarify the requirements in employing human resources that what kind of ability is necessary to carry out the business strategy, the organizational strategy and the strategy for strengthening the management power. However, today’s university education does not always foster these required human resources. And, various ideas of the employment measures like the employment through Internet are necessary to find diverse human resources widely. There is the tendency to promote the employment of the mid-career personnel as an immediately useful worker, to respond to a rapid change in technology and of the market and to the various users’ requests. However, the current condition is that there is a difficulty in realizing the employment of the mid-career personnel who can be the immediately useful worker.

 

3) Fosterage and Exploitation of Human Resources

Strategy for the Personnel and Labor Management: It is necessary to eliminate seniority factors and to build the evaluation system that treats the outcome / the business performance of the individual and the contribution degree appropriately. It is necessary to respect specialty (professional) in the information technology and to build a system that evaluates each specialty fairly. It is necessary to change an attention from ability to job (duty), to define each duty / role for that and to clarify the necessary ability for that. It is necessary to form a system that evaluates and treats the mid-career employees fairly.

Strategy for Exploiting Human Resources: It is necessary to build a system that makes the flexible assignment and shift for appropriate allocation of personnel possible. It is necessary to build an in-house system that promotes re-education for promoting the personnel shift and re-assignment for appropriate allocation of personnel.

Alliance Strategy: It is necessary to consider the human resources strategy also including exploitation of partners and outsourcing as a substitution of human resources that cannot be found within the own company.

 

4) Correspondence to the Human Resources that cannot keep up with a change and the Elderly Human Resources

Out-placement and Strategy for Elderly People: To place the employment maintenance among the important duties of the company. Necessary to also consider a guide into positive labor transference for putting forth the ability as one of the options, without sticking to the only in-house matching. To grope the appropriate style of employment absorbance and the possibility in the whole industry. Necessary to examine the measures for strengthening their characters, since many of full-experienced seniors can correspond to the upstream software development and/or have consulting ability for clients. To consider an extension of employment term like an extension of the mandatory retirement, for the experts that nobody can alternate with.

 

Publication Date / Organization that conducted Research

September 2000 / Published by JISA

 

Available in these languages: Japanese

 

How a Copy of the Study/Report/Survey Can be Obtained (URL, contact):

Junko Kawauchi, JISA at info@jisa.or.jp


Japan

 

2. Survey on IT Engineers' View of Occupation and Incentives

______________________________________________________________________

Scope of study and brief summary of findings:

The Purpose is to research the working consciousness of employees of JISA member companies from the various viewpoints and obtain basic materials concerning the occupational view of IT engineers, location of incentive and an ideal working style for an outlook on the future personnel and employment system in this industry. Brief summary of findings:

 

l        Generally, IT engineers have high intention to the technical ability and do not particular about the kind of industry and job. However, this tendency changes with age. As to the working ability, self-evaluation of PM and SA is high, but that of relatively young programmers is low. This shows young programmers need the development of the ability, such as network technical knowledge, hardware technical knowledge and the management ability.

l        While IT engineers respect the development of the ability through their jobs, the salary and the role in the job, companies respect the clients’ trust, the future of the company, the development of the ability through jobs and transmission of the company policy. This shows the difference of their positions clearly. And, although IT engineers are satisfied with the freedom of holidays and flexible working hours, the degree of dissatisfaction with evaluation and payments is high. Companies recognize that both have same tendency but the degree of the recognition is quite different.

l        It is observed that the relation between eagerness and satisfaction is strong but the relation with productivity is weak. Workers who cannot have eagerness have high possibility of changing jobs. The point to encourage them is the project management and the development of the ability. And, we consider that the origin of eagerness is the clearness of the role and the purpose of the job, the opportunity of choosing a job (reflection of their opinions), the improvement of the ability through jobs and realization of the role in the company.

 

Publication Date / Organization that conducted Research:

October 2000 / JISA  The survey result and study will be formally published in May 2001.

 

Available in these languages: Japanese

 

How a Copy of the Study/Report/Survey Can be Obtained (URL, contact):

Junko Kawauchi, JISA at info@jisa.or.jp


Japan

 

3. Survey Report on Employment by SMEs in IT Industry in Tokyo Metropolitan Area

______________________________________________________________________

Scope of study and brief summary of findings:  In the circumstance that the limit of employment absorbance is recognized in the many industries, the information industry, anticipated to develop greatly, might be considered as the recipient of workers transferred from other industries. Therefore, this survey was held to catch the real situation of the employment and changing jobs in this field and to refer for formulating measures for the future. The survey was implemented after the discussion at the committee (Chairman of the committee: Prof. Hiroki Satoh, the Social Science Research Center of Tokyo University), based on the results of questionnaires for the information industry companies with under 300-employee scale and the IT engineers of those companies and of the hearing for the companies.

 

Brief summary of findings: Considering the survey results, the following measures are considered to be important for the future to cope with a shortage of engineers in the information industry.

1) Positive Propulsion of Changing Jobs from Other Industries and Other Occupations

It is not always necessary to stick to IT qualification and/or experiences of IT business in the case of changing jobs to the information industry. The need of workers, who have experiences of other fields and qualification except IT, is also pretty rather high for System Engineer (SE) and Project Manager (PM), and even the inexperienced people can become programmer (PG) within the rather short training period. We should pay attention especially to the possibility of changing jobs to the IT industry by the human resources with knowledge and experiences except IT.

 

2) Attention to the Possibility of Changing Jobs of the Middle-Aged and Old-Aged

The importance of the generality like management ability is higher than the technical ability in a narrow sense in the field of the system development, and the restriction on the ceiling of employing age is loosened for some occupation. We should recognize that human resources that have both large business experience in other industries and other occupations and large experience of life can be active even in the information industry, and should promote changing jobs of those human resources. Especially, the public employment office could play a great role in fixing up jobs for changing jobs of these full-experienced middle-aged and old aged.

 

3) Fosterage of Human Resources that the Need Concentrates on

As for programmers, the urgent matter is to foster and find human resources that can use Web / Content, that the demand is especially high, and use Java and C++ in language.

In the occupations that require accumulation of experience like project managers, even if it is hard to foster within the short training period, it is significant to increase the training opportunities to learn applicable systematic knowledge like the method of business analysis and the way to summarize the whole project.

 

4) Reinforcement and Spread of Training

In the public training, it is necessary to provide more suitable curriculum for the need of the field by exchanging information with the companies. And the synergy also with the private educational institutions should be raised on the basis of each role. In the process of training, it is necessary to supply more opportunities of practical experience like participating in building an actual system. As the degree of recognition of the company and workers for the public training plan is still low, it is necessary to make a condition of easy use by thinking more ideas for publicity.

 

5) Provision of Time-Free Self-Cultivation Opportunity

It is necessary to provide training opportunities that workers can use freely, such as correspondence education and Internet, and with higher practicability. Internet use is considered to be effective especially for IT engineers.

 

Publication Date / Organization that conducted Research: Will be formally published soon by Tokyo Metropolitan Government, Bureau of Labor and Economic Affairs.

 

Available in these languages: Japanese

 

How a Copy of the Study/Report/Survey Can be Obtained (URL, contact):

Junko Kawauchi, JISA at info@jisa.or.jp

 

 

4. Rate of IT service companies feeling personnel shortage

______________________________________________________________________

Scope of study and brief summary of findings, Publication Date / Organization that conducted Research:

Regularly conducted four times a year by METI (Ministry of Economic and Trade Industry). Only percentage chart of the survey result is available (not as a study or report)

 

Available in these languages: Japanese and English

 

How a Copy of the Study/Report/Survey Can be Obtained (URL, contact):

Junko Kawauchi, JISA at info@jisa.or.jp

 


Mexico

 

1. Perspectivas del Mercado Laboral en la Industria de Tecnología en México

______________________________________________________________________

Scope of Study/Report/Survey and brief summary of findings

Scope:  Human resources for the IT Industry, versus the overall graduates from Mexican Universities or Technological High-Schools in year 2000.

 

Findings:  Professional University graduates amount to 0.25% of the total population, even that the contribution of University graduates has been growing at a higher than 4% rate each year since 1980, and that it has even duplicated in this period. Students graduating versus students starting courses is under 60%.  This means that from each 10 students starting high education, only 6 finish.   The figure shrinks even more when we focus only in Information Technology disciplines.  From each ten students starting their studies, only two finish.   The first explanation is that due the relative new incorporation of this careers with focus towards technology, there is a high rate of incorporation and a low level of terminal students. The second explanation of this phenomenon is the natural difference between the scholar population and the high rate of abandon of studies in volatile economies such as the Mexican, highly influenced by the increase in demand in the 1998 – 1999 period for technicians / professionals with skills in programming to face the Y2K bug.   Certifications play a key role as a selection criteria  versus the sole professional title. The total figure for students from technological careers amounts to 8% of the total University students in year 2000.   The number of University professionals is by itself very low, and the low penetration of technology professionals in the total of professionals make this labor market specially preoccupying.   The cities of the so-called “Golden Triangle” (Mexico City, Guadalajara and Monterrey) contribute with 50% of the total technology professionals.     Regional Technological Institutions play a key role to spread knowledge. A shift towards technology-oriented careers is urgently needed.  A gross paradox is that the most demanded careers are Law and Accounting in a country with severe technological and technical needs. Companies with certification programs should approach public Universities and offer students with the possibility of carrying a certification program as part of their curricula.   A great effort has to be made to cope with the expectations and human resources needs of the Industry.

 

Publication Date / Organization that Conducted Research:

April, 2000    Select – IDC

 

Available in these Languages:  Spanish only

 

How a Copy of the Study/Report/Survey Can be Obtained (URL, contact):

www.select-idc.com.mx       Mr. Guillermo Olivero


Netherlands

 

1. ICT Marktmonitor™ 2000-2001

______________________________________________________________________

Scope of Study/Report/Survey:

Provides detailed data on number of people working in IT sector, job growth, job openings, and the effect of ICT on employment in the Netherlands.

 

Brief summary of findings: The number of people working in the IT sector in the Netherlands increased to 203,000 employees in 2000. The IT specialists in this group increased by 2,500 people to almost 67,000. Job growth slowed  down considerably in 2000 in comparison to previous years. Due to this, the shortage at the end of 2000 was significantly lower than the previous year: The shortage was reduced by half to 7,400 people. Added to the telecom sector, this is still more than 14,500. Two observations was made: In the first place, the percentage of people leaving the sector is still calculated at 3 percent, while this could be higher in reality. This immediately translates into a higher shortage in the IT sector: one percent more people leaving means 700 more job openings. Secondly, it was assumed that 1,500 computer specialists would be hired per year. This is about 60 percent of all Higher Vocational Education graduates. CBS counted decreasing number of job openings in the IT sector over the first three quarters of 2000 (11.000, 8,000, and 7,000 respectively). The rate of job openings (the number of job openings per 1,000 jobs) fluctuated between 85 and 70, which amounts to an average of more than 5,300 job openings. For the entire ICT sector, the figures are about twice as high. Of the 7,400 people needed in the telecom sector, about 3,000 are network specialists; the other 4,400 are IT professionals.

 

In the event the sector grows by 7.5 percent, the shortage of ICT workers will quickly increase again in 2001. Just like in 2000, the job growth is is immediately translated into shortages in the labor market. In a structural sense, the problem of the IT professional has not been solved at all. While the labor market in the ICT sector remains under pressure, ICT also appears to have, in the balance, a positive effect on the development of employment in the Netherlands. A study concluded that overall employment will increase by 1.2 percent until 2003. 0.5 percent of that could be contributed to ICT.

 

Organization that Conducted Research:  FENIT (Federatie Nederlandse IT-bedrijven) and V-ICTN (Vereniging ICT Nederland), in cooperation with Heliview arketingservices B.V.

 

Available in these Languages: Dutch, English

 

How a Copy of the Study/Report/Survey Can be Obtained (URL, contact):

Machiel de Rooij at FENIT (Federatie Nederlandse IT-bedrijven): machiel.de.rooij@fenit.nl / Tel. +31 348 - 49 38 38


Northern Ireland

 

1. Software Industry Federation – Survey 2000

______________________________________________________________________

Scope of Study/Report/Survey and brief summary of findings

 

Ø      Survey of 170 SIF member companies – mainly in the Software and Telecom sectors but also including the IT departments of some user organizations

Ø      About 6000 employed in SIF Member companies

Ø      Market is tightest for those with 3+ years experience

Ø      Need additional team leaders and junior Project Managers

Ø      About 1 in 12 vacancies remains unfilled

Ø      Lower growth potential and inability to develop new products are the main problems experienced by companies with skills shortages.

 

Date of Publication/Organization that Conducted Research:

June 2000 / Software Industry Federation.  New survey being prepared for publication June 2001

 

Approximate Funding Amount:  £12,000

 

Available in these Languages:  English

 

How a Copy of the Study/Report/Survey Can be Obtained (URL, contact):

http://www.sif.co.uk/survey2000/index_SIF.html

 

2. IT’s the future

______________________________________________________________________

Scope of Study/Report/Survey and brief summary of findings

 

Ø      Strategy for the Software and Telecom sectors in Northern Ireland

Ø      Identified 10 key recommendations to develop the industry for the future

Ø      Set targets for the growth of the sector (18,000 staff and £2bn revenue by 2004)

Ø      Study was built on success of other high growth areas (e.g. R. of Ireland & Israel)

 

Date of Publication / Organization that Conducted Research:

June 1999 / Software Industry Federation

 

Approximate Funding Amount:  £20,000

 

Available in these Languages:  English

 

How a Copy of the Study/Report/Survey Can be Obtained (URL, contact):

Ken Frame of the Software Industry Federation (SIF) at Ken@sif.co.uk.


Northern Ireland

 

3. The Way Forward

______________________________________________________________________

Scope of Study/Report/Survey and brief summary of findings

Ø      Produced as a result of a skills workshop held in 1998. 

Ø      Identified the areas of IT skills issues in the Northern Ireland context and suggested actions that could be taken to address the issues.

Ø      Has been used over the last 3 years to guide SIF and local government policy on the skills issues in the industry

Ø      A follow-up workshop is planned for March / April 2001

 

Date of Publication / Organization that Conducted Research:

May 1998 / Software Industry Federation

 

Approximate Funding Amount:  £12,000 - £15,000

 

Available in these Languages:  English

 

How a Copy of the Study/Report/Survey Can be Obtained (URL, contact):

By e-mail from ken@sif.co.uk

 

 

4. A study of the Northern Ireland Labour Market for IT skills

______________________________________________________________________

Scope of Study/Report/Survey and brief summary of findings

Ø      Identified shortages in the industry for those with 3+ years experience

Ø      Indicated a balance between graduate output and entry level requirement

Ø      Concerns by companies in terms of business skills in the industry

 

Date of Publication / Organization that Conducted Research:

August 2000 / Northern Ireland Economic Research Council (NIERC)

 

Available in these Languages:  English

 

How a Copy of the Study/Report/Survey Can be Obtained (URL, contact):

Hard copy available from DHFETE, Research and Evaluation Branch

39-49 Adelaide St, Belfast, BT2 8FD. Tele +44 28 9025 7777


Northern Ireland

 

5. The IT Skills Forecasting Study: Labour Market Bulletin 14

______________________________________________________________________

Scope of Study/Report/Survey and brief summary of findings

Ø      Summary of the above report

 

Date of Publication / Organization that Conducted Research:

November 2000 / NIERC

 

Available in these Languages: English

 

How a Copy of the Study/Report/Survey Can be Obtained (URL, contact):

Hard copy available from DHFETE, Research and Evaluation Branch

39-49 Adelaide St, Belfast, BT2 8FD. Tele +44 28 9025 7777

 

Norway

 

1. Value Creation in Norway

______________________________________________________________________

Scope of Study/Report/Survey and brief summary of findings

Looks at growth-potential in 4 industry sectors among them the ICT industry

The report concludes that form the 2000-2003 Norway will experience a lack of IT-employees on a annually basis of 15.000 in this period this sums up to 45.000 in the year 2003

 

Publication Date / Organization that Conducted Research:

November 2000 / The Norwegian School of Management BI

 

Available in these Languages:  Norwegian/English

 

How a Copy of the Study/Report/Survey Can be Obtained (URL, contact):

http://web.bi.no/english or contact Fredrik Syversen (ICT Norway) at fredrik.syversen@ikt-norge.no.

 


Singapore

 

1. Infocomm Manpower & Skills Survey

______________________________________________________________________

Scope of Study/Report/Survey: The 1999 Infocomm Manpower & Skills Survey is the first joint Infocomm manpower survey launched by the Infocomm Development Authority of Singapore (IDA). The survey seeks to determine the projected requirements of the infocomm (ICT) manpower and skills in Singapore and to assess the importance and satisfaction of job-related factors. It also seeks to determine the current state of the infocomm manpower in Singapore in terms of manpower size and distribution as well as their skills profile.

 

Brief summary of findings: As at end of 1999, the number of Infocomm manpower in Singapore was estimated to be 92,800. The Infocomm manpower demand is projected to grow 10%-12% per year for the next two years.  This implies that the total number of Infocomm manpower in Singapore will reach 114,000 by the year 2001. The survey findings showed a high demand for Infocomm manpower in Singapore.  Averaging about 10,000 per year, jobs in the area of E-Commerce Development will experience the highest growth rate and is also one of the top 5 skills that organisations sought after. 

 

The survey also highlights the shift in the training delivery methods, where computer-based and web-based training will play a more important role in upgrading the skills of our Infocomm manpower. In particular, the perceived gap in Infocomm staff training needs to be noted because  technology changes are so rapid today that technical knowledge can be made obsolete within 18 months.  The key challenge faced by organisations is therefore how to keep training costs down and yet ensure their Infocomm professionals are up-to-speed on emerging technologies.

 

The results of the survey would serve as inputs to the IDA in formulating policies that would build a qualified pool of Infocomm manpower in Singapore.

 

Date of Publication / Organization that Conducted Research:

March 4, 2000 / Infocomm Development Authority of Singapore (IDA).

 

Available in these Languages:  English

 

How a Copy of the Study/Report/Survey Can be Obtained: See http://www.ida.gov.sg/Website/IDAhome.nsf/Home?OpenForm (facts & figures section)


South Africa

 

1. South African IT Industry Strategy Project (SAITIS)

______________________________________________________________________

Scope/Purpose of Initiative:

3 year project from 1999 to 2002, includes research into numbers employed in each Province of South Africa, racial analysis and gender analysis.

 

Brief summary of project goal: The South African Information Technology Industry Strategy (SAITIS) project was conceived during the emergence of the new democratic order in South Africa in 1994. This period of transition required the dismantling of Apartheid structures and their replacement with processes which would empower and enfranchise all South Africans. The then Minister of Posts and Telecommunications, Mr. Jay Naidoo, supported by the then Deputy President, Mr. Thabo Mbeki, initiated the SAITIS project  the aim of which was to bridge the global and local development gaps in the use and application of Information and Communications Technologies. The SAITIS project encompassed the challenge to build a robust, growing and sustainable South African Information and Communications Technology Sector (see appendix for definition of the ICT Sector) that would directly support and contribute to the challenges of sustainable economic growth, social upliftment and empowerment. Government, as well as other stakeholders, recognized the need for a coherent national ICT Sector strategy that would increase South Africa’s economic strength and ensure the involvement of the wider population in the development of this sector. Close to 1,000 representatives of the key stakeholder groups including government, industry, labor, academia and civil society took an active role in the development of strategies through a series of Working Groups, Workshops and Fora.

 

A process will be established to review, refine and prioritize existing initiatives over time. The full ICT Sector Development Framework is presented in three volumes. The first volume comprises a summary of the ICT Sector Development Framework (this document). The second volume comprises the strategies, actions and “Going Forward Plan” for development for the South African ICT Sector. A third volume includes supporting appendices. All three volumes are published on the SAITIS website at www.saitis.co.za.

 

Organizations Involved in Initiative: The Department of Trade and Industry is the leading Government Department hosting this project, in collaboration with the Department of Communication. This project is made possible through the financial support of the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA).

Duration of Initiative: Baseline Study published early 2000. Summary: November 2000.

Approximate Funding Amount: Funding approximately $100K

Summaries/Reports Available in these Languages  English

More Information: See the South African Information Technology Industry Strategy Web site at http://www.saitis.co.za/.


South Africa

 

2. Report by the Information Systems, Electronics & Telecommunications Technologies Sector Education & Training Authority (ISETT SETA)

______________________________________________________________________

Scope/Purpose of Initiative:

Body set up to administer Skills Development programs in the sector.

 

Brief summary of project goal: The Information Systems, Electronics and Telecommunications Technologies SETA (ISETT) have the primary responsibility for setting up learnerships in the above economic sector. ISETT will check that all proposed learnerships meet relevant criteria, and will then register the learnership with the Department of Labour. Based on the Skills development Act (No 97 of 1998) some of the functions of the ISETT will be to:

 

1. Develop a Sector Skills Plan within the framework of the National Skills Development Strategy;

 

2. Implement our Sector Skills Plan by

3. The ISETT will also promote learnerships by

4. The ISETT will register learnership agreements in the Information Systems, Electronics and Telecommunication Technologies sector with the Department of Labour

5. Collect and disburse Skills Development Levies in our sector

6. Liase with the National Skills Authority in the Department of Labour on;

 

Organizations Involved in Initiative: The Information Systems, Electronics and Telecommunications Technologies SETA (ISETT)

Duration of Initiative: Ongoing from 2000.

Approximate Funding Amount: $13 million annually.

Summaries/Reports Available in these Languages: English

More Information: Reports and plans published in English at www.isett.org.za.


Sweden

 

 

1. SITO’s Program for IT Skills 2001

______________________________________________________________________

Scope of Study/Report/Survey and brief summary of findings

SITO’s 2001 IT skills program is outlined in a report which identifies problems and priorities in the IT skills area.

 

Some of the strengths of the Swedish IT industry were summarized as follows:

1. The Swedish educational system is world class and recognizes industry’s need for depth and breadth within the IT field. 2. Labor market: There is a healthy balance between supply and demand, and wages are at an acceptable level. The IT industry’s recruitment base is wide. More women than ever are drawn to the industry. 3. The IT industry has a solid competency structure which is maintained and developed through life-long learning, educational systems and organizations, and by being cutting-edge in regard to technological developments. 4. Industry maintains a high competency level within the IT field, which contributes to the industry’s competitiveness globally. 5. Society in genera protects and promotes the ability and rights of individuals to life-long learning. 6. Society and customers had high regards for the IT industry, and associated it with the future, quality, seriousness and long-term growth.

 

Priority areas, as outlined by SITO:

1.      The educational system

2.      The labor market, nationally and internationally

3.      The individual IT businesses

4.      Public opinion

 

Organization that Conducted Research:  Swedish IT-companies' Organisation (SITO)

 

Available in these Languages:  Swedish

 

How a Copy of the Study/Report/Survey Can be Obtained:

Project Leader Ewa Thorslund (SITO) at ewa.thorslund@itforetagen.se


UK

 

1. Stevens report: Final report from the ITCE skills strategy group – skills for the information age

______________________________________________________________________

Scope of Study/Report/Survey and brief summary of findings

To develop a National Strategy for ITCE and in particular to advise and make recommendations on appropriate action on:

ways of making careers in the ITEC sector more attractive to (e.g.,) women and young people, including the provision of better careers information and advice.

 

Publication Date / Organization that Conducted Research:

July 1999.  ITCE skills strategy group – Government, Industry and trade bodies

 

How a Copy of the Study/Report/Survey Can be Obtained (URL, contact):

http://www.dfee.gov.uk/skillsforce/7.htm

 


USA

 

1. Bridging the Gap: Information Technology Skills for a New Millennium

______________________________________________________________________

Scope of Study/Report/Survey and brief summary of findings

There are more than a million good reasons to consider a career in the Information Technology (IT) industry today. That's because employers will create a demand in this country for roughly 1.6 million IT workers this year. With demand for appropriately skilled people far exceeding supply, half of these positions--843,328--will likely go unfilled. In a total U.S. IT workforce of 10 million, that shortfall means one job in every dozen will be vacant.

 

This study explains how information technology has dramatically changed the composition of the U.S. workforce by producing an incredible demand for IT workers. Unlike previous research restricted to narrow "core" job categories--computer programmers, systems analysts and computer scientists--this work looks at the bigger picture and describes a far more vibrant and diverse technical population. Using the eight "career clusters" developed by the Northwest Center for Emerging Technologies (NWCET), essentially the IT workforce writ large, this study offers findings in four major areas:

 

  1. The overall size of the IT workforce, the demand for qualified workers and the gap between supply and demand
  2. The hottest, most in demand jobs
  3. The skills workers need to grab one of these hot jobs
  4. The best ways for workers to acquire these skills

 

Top findings provide information regarding:

1.      Size of the IT workforce, the demand for qualified workers and the gap between supply and demand

2.      The hottest, most in demand jobs

3.      The skills workers need to grab one of these hot jobs

4.      The best ways for workers to acquire these skills

 

Publication Date / Organization that Conducted Research:

April 2000. Information Technology Association of America (ITAA)

 

Available in these Languages:  English

 

How a Copy of the Study/Report/Survey Can be Obtained (URL, contact):

http://www.itaa.org/workforce/


USA

 

2. The Digital Workforce: Building Infotech Skills at the Speed of Innovation

______________________________________________________________________

Scope of Study/Report/Survey and brief summary of findings

The demand for IT workers will only mushroom with 1.4 million more jobs more computer programmers, computer scientists and engineers needed by 2003, according to this report on expanding the IT workforce in the U.S.

 

Publication Date / Organization that Conducted Research:

June 1999 / The U.S. Commerce Department

Available in these Languages:  English

See a Copy: U.S. Department of Commerce Technology Administration: http://www.ta.doc.gov/reports.htm#ustps.

http://www.ta.doc.gov/Reports/TechPolicy/digital.pdf.

 

 

3. Building a Workforce for the Information Economy

______________________________________________________________________

Scope of Study/Report/Survey and brief summary of findings

The need for IT workers depends on the demand for IT throughout the economy, both in the United States and worldwide. And IT markets and talent can be found all over the world. IT is becoming increasingly ubiquitous, and with that trend has come a burgeoning demand for IT workers, both to enable the use of existing information technologies and to develop such technologies for the future. There is a growing body of evidence that IT is playing a significant role in improving national productivity, and that any constraints on IT production and support – such as those that might arise from excessive tightness in the IT workforce – may have a pervasive impact on the growth of the economy (report available in full online, ref. link below). The purpose of the report was to investigate domestic high-technology workforce needs and sources of supply over the next ten years, and the status of older workers in the IT field. H1-B visa quotas are thoroughly examined.

 

Publication Date / Organization that Conducted Research:

October 2000 / The National Research Council.

Available in these Languages:  English

How a Copy of the Study/Report/Survey Can be Obtained (URL, contact):

The National Academy Press: http://www.nap.edu/. Direct link: http://books.nap.edu/books/0309069939/html/1.html.


USA

 

4. A Nation of Opportunity: Building Americas 21st Century Workforce

______________________________________________________________________

Scope of Study/Report/Survey and brief summary of findings

The 21st Century Workforce Commission was established by Congress to take a “snapshot” of the IT workforce around the country. The Commission – 17 members with relevant expertise from business, education, labor and government – was charged with studying and recommending to the President and Congress how best to ensure that American workers have the opportunity to prepare for and succeed in the IT jobs of today and tomorrow. The Committee believes that the current and future health of America’s 21st Century Economy depends directly on how broadly and deeply Americans reach a new level of literacy – “21st Century Literacy” – that includes strong academic skills, thinking, reasoning, teamwork skills, and proficiency in using technology. The Commission has identified 9 Keys to Success that leaders at all levels can apply to build a highly skilled workforce prepared for high technology job opportunities in the 21st Century:

 

  1. Building 21st Century Literacy;
  2. Exercising Leadership through Partnerships;
  3. Forming Learning Linkages for Youth;
  4. Identifying Pathways into IT Jobs;
  5. Increasing Acquisition of IT Skills;
  6. Expanding Continuous Learning;
  7. Shaping a Flexible Immigration Policy for Skilled IT Workers;
  8. Raising Student Achievement; and
  9. Making Technology Access and Internet Connectivity Universal.

 

Publication Date / Organization that Conducted Research:

June 2000 / 21st Century Work Force Committee.

 

Available in these Languages:  English

 

How a Copy of the Study/Report/Survey Can be Obtained (URL, contact):

U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Policy. 2000 Constitution Avenue, NW. Washington, D.C. 20210. USA.


USA

 

5. Falling Through the Net: Toward Digital Inclusion

______________________________________________________________________

Scope of Study/Report/Survey and brief summary of findings

This report is the 4th in the Falling Through the Net series. In this report, we measured the extent of digital inclusion by looking at households and individuals that have a computer and an Internet connection. We measure the digital divide, as we have before, by looking at the differences in the shares of each group that is digitally connected. For the first time, we also provide data on high-speed access to the Internet, as well as access to the Internet  and computers by people with disabilities.

 

The data show that the overall level of U.S. digital inclusion is rapidly increasing. But the rapid uptake of new technologies is occurring among most groups of Americans, regardless of income, education, race or ethnicity, location, age, or gender, suggesting that digital inclusion is a realizable goal.  Nonetheless. A digital divide remains or has expanded slightly in some cases, even while Internet access and computer ownership are rising rapidly for almost all groups. For example, our most recent data show that divides still exist between those with different levels of income and education, different racial and ethnic groups, old and young, single and dual-parent families, and those with and without disabilities. Internet access is no longer a luxury item, but a resource used by many. Overall, the findings in this report show that there has been tremendous progress in just 20 months, but much work remains to be done. Computer ownership and Internet access rates are rapidly rising nationwide and for almost all groups. Nonetheless, there are still sectors of Americans that are not digitally connected.

 

Date of Publication / Organization that Conducted Research:

October 2000 / The U.S. Department of Commerce; National Telecommunications Administration / Economic and Statistics Administration.

 

Available in these Languages:  English

 

How a Copy of the Study/Report/Survey Can be Obtained:

Brian DeAtley at the Information Technology Association of America (ITAA) at bdeatley@itaa.org or Tel. +1 703-284-5323.


USA

 

6. The American Workforce in the New Millennium: The Growing Demand for Skills

______________________________________________________________________

Scope of Study/Report/Survey and brief summary of findings

This report examines the changing skill needs of today's business community, and the roles that government, business, and community institutions can all play to ensure that the U.S. labor force, and African Americans in particular, meet employer demands.

 

The report draws from the Joint Center's first annual Corporate Leadership Forum on the 21st century American workforce. At the Corporate Forum, U.S. Secretary of Labor Alexis Herman; Dr. Albert Siu, human resources vice president for education and training at AT&T; and Dr. Margaret Simms, vice president for research at the Joint Center, presented to a diverse group of business leaders. The presentations and discussions that followed are summarized in this report. Highlights include training investments by employers; federal initiatives for workforce development; post-secondary education and other training difficulties; difficulties faced by small businesses; training needs of the African American workforce; and concerns over hiring ex-offenders.

 

Date of Publication / Organization that Conducted Research:

September 1999 / The Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies

 

Available in these Languages:  English

 

How a Copy of the Study/Report/Survey Can be Obtained (URL, contact):

Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies Web site at http://www.jointcenter.org/. and http://www.jointcenter.org/selpaper/workforc.htm.


 

INITIATIVES

 

This section encompasses initiatives that seek to address the growing IT skills gap in WITSA countries and regions. It does not attempt to include traditional employment-based government programs, but rather those initiatives, whether organized by industry, organizations or government, which specifically tries to bridge the “gap” between industry’s need for skilled labor and the training of such professionals in the private and public sectors.

 

Australia

 

1. Skills Exchange

______________________________________________________________________

Scope/Purpose of Initiative (Include brief summary of project goal)

The Federal Government has provided a $5 million grant over two years to seed the start-up of an IT&T Skills Exchange, provided similar backing is derived from industry. The key objectives:

n       Awareness – current and projected business demand for IT&T solutions is far outstripping the capability of the IT&T industry to respond.  The limiting factor, the supply of people with appropriate IT&T skills, is projected to get worse.  Awareness of IT&T and the perception that it is just for geeks, nerds and propeller heads is the greatest inhibitor.  Encouraging new people into IT&T careers is considered the highest priority for the Exchange.  “We want our best people in all fields to know that there is the opportunity to do exciting, important and globally leading work here in Australia” states Ziggy Switkowski, CEO of Telstra.

n       Market Intelligence – there is general understanding of the need for more skilled people in IT&T.  However there is a lack of in-depth knowledge of the particular areas of greatest demand and the competencies needed for people to fill those positions.  The Exchange needs to conduct market research and analysis to identify these key skills areas.  It needs to develop competency standards for positions in these skills areas which industry and individuals can target for development.  Together with industry, it needs to develop strategies to fill these gaps mixing training and on-the-job experience to increase the skills resource base.

n       Course commissioning and brokering – the third role for the Exchange is to facilitate the matching of supply with demand.  The current process is not sufficiently responsive to industry demands.  The solution is considered to be a mix of better-targeted courses and establishing a broking role between industry and education service providers to match training requirements to individual organisation’s needs.  The Exchange will commission the development of IT&T courses to meet industry demand identified through its market research.  It will perform the role of broker either direct or through ‘agent brokers’.  Agent brokers will act in the name of the Exchange to promote its brand.  Agent brokers will also promote the use the Electronic marketplace established by the Exchange as well as the  courses commissioned by the Exchange to meet industry demand.

 

Organizations Involved in Initiative: Federal Government and Skills Exchange

Summaries/Reports Available in these Languages:  English

More Information: http://www.aiia.com.au/education


Australia

 

2. MCEETYA Ministers Joint Statement on Education and Training in the Information Economy

______________________________________________________________________

Scope/Purpose of Initiative (Include brief summary of project goal)

At their March 2000 meeting, Ministers for Education, Employment,  Training and Youth Affairs agreed to make this statement, reinforcing their support for the broad directions of the Education and Training Action Plan for the Information Economy, Learning for the Knowledge Society.

 

SHARED VISION

In the information economy, quality education and training is fundamental to the well-being of individuals, communities and nations. Schools, vocational education and training providers and universities all have a key role to play in contributing to Australia's development as  an equitable, imaginative and economically strong knowledge society. Education and training will continue to grow in importance as Australia's economy and society become more knowledge-based and globally integrated.

 

Information and communications technologies (ICT) offer the sector a vast array of opportunities to deliver its services better, more accessibly and more cost-effectively, while taking full advantage of the benefits of networked learning communities. These technologies are also exposing the sector, as well as the community generally, to the challenges of global  competition.

 

Realising the opportunities and meeting the challenges will require collaboration and partnerships. The Action Plan provides a strategic agenda on which the Commonwealth, States/Territories and all parts of the education and training sector will work together to achieve the  national outcomes identified in the Plan.


 

Australia

 

3. Learning for the knowledge society

______________________________________________________________________

Scope/Purpose of Initiative (Include brief summary of project goal)

Learning for the knowledge society: An education and training action plan for the information economy

 

This Plan identifies a number of strategic priorities to enable the education and   training sector to play a key role in the wider information economy agenda. The broad outcomes of the Plan were supported by MCEETYA in March 2000.

 

Organizations Involved in Initiative: Australian National Training Authority

Summaries/Reports Available in these Languages: English

More Information about the Initiative can be Obtained (URL, contact):

http://www.detya.gov.au/schools/publications/reports/learning/learning.htm

 

 

 

Austria

 

1. Local Initiative: Qualification Dialogue of the City of Vienna

______________________________________________________________________

Scope/Purpose of Initiative: General remarks:

1)      No Green Card initiative as in Germany.

2)      No overall Austria Strategy.

3)      General Strategy: Increase the expenditures for education (especially Polytechnical universities of advanced studies (Fachhochschulen)

4)      Increased immigration of qualified workforce did not gain consent of the Government.

 

Organizations Involved in Initiative: City of Vienna, Industry

Duration of Initiative: 1999-???

Summaries/Reports Available in these Languages: German

Approximate Funding Amount: Some public funds available.

Contact: Gerhard K. Wagner, General Secretary of VIW (Federation for the Information Industry in Austria): gkwagner@via.at.


Austria

 

 

2. Sectoral Qualifying Initiative of the Electronic Industry (Überbetrieblicher Qualifizierungsverbund des FEEI)

______________________________________________________________________

Scope/Purpose of Initiative: General remarks:

1)      No Green Card initiative as in Germany.

2)      No overall Austria Strategy.

3)      General Strategy: Increase the expenditures for education (especially Polytechnical universities of advanced studies (Fachhochschulen)

4)      Increased immigration of qualified workforce did not gain consent of the Government.

 

Organizations Involved in Initiative: Electronic and Mobile Telecom Industry

Duration of Initiative: 2000 ???

Summaries/Reports Available in these Languages: German

Approximate Funding Amount: Some public funds available.

Contact: Gerhard K. Wagner, General Secretary of VIW (Federation for the Information Industry in Austria): gkwagner@via.at.

 

 

 

Belgium

 

1 ROAD SHOW

______________________________________________________________________

Scope/Purpose of Initiative (Include brief summary of project goal)

CREATION OF AWARENESS

 

Organizations Involved in Initiative: Ministry of Economic Affairs

 

Duration of Initiative: 2 years

 

Approximate Funding Amount: 750 000 USD

 


Canada

 

1. Facilitated Processing for Information Technology Workers

______________________________________________________________________

Scope/Purpose of Initiative (Include brief summary of project goal)

In response to the need of employers to fill critical shortages in the software industry, Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) collaborated with Human Resources Development Canada (HRDC), Industry Canada and the Software Human Resource Council (SHRC) on the development of a pilot project to streamline the entry of those workers whose skills are in high demand in the software industry and whose entry into the Canadian labour market would have no negative impact on Canadian job seekers and workers. Under normal circumstances, a foreign worker who wishes to work in Canada requires an employment authorization from CIC and a validated job offer from a local HRDC office. If the HRDC office determines that there are no Canadian citizens or

permanent residents available to fill the position, the job offer to the foreign worker

is validated and the worker may then apply for an employment authorization for admission to Canada.

 

Organizations Involved in Initiative:

Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC), Human Resources Development Canada (HRDC), Industry Canada and the Software Human Resource Council (SHRC)

 

Duration of Initiative:  1997-ongoing

 

Summaries/Reports Available in these Languages  English and French

 

More Information about the Initiative can be Obtained (URL, contact):

http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/visit/itw-e.html; http://www.shrc.ca/search/index.html


Canada

 

2. Canada Foundation for Innovation

______________________________________________________________________

Scope/Purpose of Initiative (Include brief summary of project goal)

The Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) is an independent corporation

established by the Government of Canada in 1997. The Foundation's goal is to

strengthen the capability of Canadian universities, colleges, research hospitals,

and other not-for-profit institutions to carry out world-class research and

technology development. By investing in research infrastructure projects, the CFI

supports research excellence, and helps strengthen research training at institutions

across Canada.

 

Organizations Involved in Initiative:  Numerous public/private research and business communities

 

Duration of Initiative:  1997-2005

 

Approximate Funding Amount:  $5.5 billion Cdn

 

Summaries/Reports Available in these Languages  English and French

 

More Information: http://www.innovation.ca/english/index/index.html

 

 

3. Mapping IT Labour Market

______________________________________________________________________

Scope/Purpose of Initiative (Include brief summary of project goal)

Examine the supply and demand of skilled workers in IT sectors

In spring 2000 a pilot survey of 3,500 employers was conducted by Statistics Canada. The survey focused on issues such as recruitment, training and labour turnover (as of now, the results have not been released). It is intended that the pilot survey will turn into an economy-wide survey.

 

Organizations Involved in Initiative: Statistics Canada, Human Resources Development Canada (HRDC), and the Software Human Resource Council (SHRC)

 

Summaries/Reports Available in these Languages:  English and French

 

More Information: http://www.shrc.ca/lmi/index.html

(see "Inventory of Labour Market Information in Information Technology" report)


Canada

 

4. Selective Investment in IT-related Post-secondary Programs – Ontario Access to Opportunities Program (ATOP)

______________________________________________________________________

Scope/Purpose of Initiative (Include brief summary of project goal)

In Canada, post-secondary education is a constitutional responsibility of the provincial governments.  Almost all of Canada’s colleges and universities are public institutions operating on a combination of government grants and tuition fees.  Fees have been kept very low by international standards to facilitate broad access.  Over the past decade, government grants have been frozen or, in some cases, reduced as part of Canada’s (successful) effort to get its financial affairs in order. 

 

An indirect consequence of this has been a relative shift in enrolment into low-cost programs.  As documented by Stager (above) one consequence has been virtually no growth in relatively costly core IT enrolment, despite a large overall increase in post-secondary enrolment.

 

The universities and industry brought this structural problem to the attention of governments as early as 1996.  Several provinces have responded by introducing targeted programs of increasing grants to programs leading to IT careers.  The best known is the Ontario Access to Opportunities Program or ATOP.  ATOP provides both incremental operating funds for college and university programs in computer science and electrical engineering as well as a 50% match for private funds to equip the expanded programs and provide financial support for students. 

 

Programs with similar intent have since been introduced in British Columbia, Alberta, and Quebec.

 

Organizations Involved in Initiative:  Ontario Government, industry sponsors, industry associations, colleges and universities.

Duration of Initiative:  1998-2001

Approximate Funding Amount:  $C150 million government plus approximately $100 million private support for equipment and financial aid.

Summaries/Reports Available in these Languages English and French

More Information about the Initiative can be Obtained (URL, contact):

http://mettowas21.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/general/postsec/atop/info.html#atop

 


Canada

 

5. Private and private/public postgraduate programs in IT

______________________________________________________________________

Scope/Purpose of Initiative (Include brief summary of project goal)

 

Many technical IT careers do not require a full four-year degree in computer science or electrical engineering but do require the maturity and analytical abilities of a general bachelor degree or a college diploma.  Recognizing this, several Canadian organizations have developed one-year intensive programs designed to convert non-IT degree holders into entry-level IT professionals.

 

Halifax-based ITI Education Corporation, a private corporation, offers the largest and best known of these in ten major cities across North America.  ITI now graduates about as many individuals per year as the entire Canadian community college system.

 

A private / public initiative with similar objectives is provided by several colleges under the sponsorship of the Software Human Resource Council.  Other colleges and private trainers are now offering programs of similar duration and targeting.

 

Organizations Involved in Initiatives: (a) ITI Education Corporation and corporate partners; (b) SHRC and college delivery organizations

Duration of Initiative: Ongoing

Summaries/Reports Available in these Languages:  English

More Information about the Initiative can be Obtained (URL, contact):

www.iti.com  (ITI program); www.shrc.ca  (SHRC ITP Program)

 


Canada

 

6. International Computer Driving License (ICDL)

______________________________________________________________________

Scope/Purpose of Initiative (Include brief summary of project goal)

ICDL is an international curriculum and competency standard targeted at proficiency in end-user IT use.  Pioneered in Europe in 1994, the system today has more than 1 million individuals studying for, or holding the ICDL credential world wide.  It is available in over 50 countries and is the world’s fastest growing standard of its kind, growing at over 80% per annum. In Canada, the ICDL program is offered by ICDL Canada in cooperation with the Canadian Information Processing Society and ITAC, the Canadian licensee.

 

Organizations Involved in Initiative: ICDL Canada, ITAC, CIPS, employers, school boards, colleges, universities, private training companies.

Duration of Initiative:  ongoing

Summaries/Reports Available in these Languages:  English

More Information about the Initiative can be Obtained:  www.icdlcanada.com

 

 

Chinese Taipei

 

1. IT Professional Training Enhancement Program

______________________________________________________________________

Scope/Purpose of Initiative

The government of Chinese Taipei implemented a program to produce 22,500 IT professionals in 3 years (1999-2001). The program, named “IT Professional Training Enhancement Program “ was co-sponsored by the Vocational Training Administration and Youth Commission. The Program intended to train those college and university graduates without science or IT related degree. The courses are broken into 5 categories from programming, database management, multi-media, networking to marketing. Each participant shall be trained 500-600 hours and will receive a diploma after graduation. There are 67 pre-qualified universities, colleges and private training institutes are responsible for the training. The training cost for each student is around US$1,600. The student only pays a quarter of the tuition, 3 quarters are borne by the government. The average employment rate of these program graduates is around 70%.  CISA is contracted as the central coordinator of this Program. In the future, the government will continue to conduct similar training to increase 10,000 IT professional supply every year from short term training.

 

Duration of Initiative:  3 Years
Approximate Funding Amount:  US$32 million


EU

 

1. EU High Level Task-Force on Skills and Mobility

______________________________________________________________________

Context: Efforts are already underway to modernise national labour markets through the European employment strategy. But mobility across borders is increasing as businesses internationalise yet significant legal, administrative and practical barriers to mobility still exist: lack of information on rights and opportunities; lack of market transparency; problems of recognition of qualifications; problems of transferring across different tax and benefit systems.

Objectives: To examine the main drivers, characteristics and barriers within the emerging new European labour market. To recommend a set of policy initiatives to remove barriers and to promote the successful development of the new European labour market focusing in particular on skills and mobility.

Implementation: A high level task force will be set up. Membership will include top leaders of European business, top labour market and education experts, political representatives and social partners. The task force will be supported in its work by the Commission. Mandate:

·         To identify the main drivers and characteristics of the new European labour market, with a particular focus on skills (supply, demand, skill gaps at various levels - national, regional, sectoral, occupational - , lifelong learning) and mobility. Particular importance will be attached to the ICT skills needed for the knowledge economy.

·         To identify the main barriers to the further development of these markets, in particular in the areas of skills and mobility.

·         To report with a set of policy initiatives required to ensure open access for all to these markets by 2005 and recommendations for implementation at European and national levels.

 

The Commission will co-ordinate the implementation of this new initiative to develop the new European labour market through existing processes, (e.g. skills and mobility are part of the employment guidelines and Member States' performance is checked by the Commission when they submit national action plans) and also present to the Spring Council 2002 an action plan of further policy initiatives to open up labour markets by 2005.

Calendar:

April 2001:  Establishment of the task force
May to November 2001:  Meetings of the task force
January 2002:  Report of the task force
February 2002:  Commission Action Plan, based on the report of the task force.
March 2002:  Presentation of report and action plan to the European Council


EU

 

2. The IT Skills Gap – EU Action Points for the 2001 Stockholm Summit (23-24 March, 2001)

______________________________________________________________________

As the knowledge economy booms, business and public services are competing for people across a range of sectors as signs emerge of skills bottlenecks and labour shortages. The lack of skilled IT professionals presents a particular problem within the knowledge-based economy. One recent study by International Data Corporation suggests that demand for IT experience and skills is expected to grow from 10 million today to 13 million by 2003 producing a skills shortage equivalent to 1.7 million jobs.

With almost half the working population using computers at work, rising to three quarters for white collar workers, formal PC training either at home or in the workplace, may be a powerful tool to boost digital skills. However, less than 22% of the workforce have had any formal computer training. The number of people whose employers have paid for that training is even smaller.

Both short and medium-term answers are needed. Almost a third of the unfilled posts are for people with five or more years graduate and professional experience. In the case of IT technicians training of six to twelve months is required. The skills gap cannot easily be filled from one day to the next. The responsibility to overcome these problems falls more on industry than on public authorities.

Nevertheless there are clear tasks for governments, beyond the digital literacy targets of eEurope 2002, in improving the skills base in the European Union. Firstly, they must tackle the structural causes of the IT skills shortage - by promoting proactive education policies and life-long learning, supporting real or virtual IT training and re-training centres and speeding up the removal of barriers which prevent specialists moving and working across the European Union. Secondly, as a short-term solution, we also need to open Europe's doors more widely to skilled and talented people from other countries. This should be done within the framework of a common immigration policy which recognises the need to maximise the benefits of economic migration to the Member States, to the countries of origin and to the migrants themselves.

 

Member States should:

·        address the structural causes of the skills gap, particularly in the context of education and life-long learning, and

·        in the short-term, identify skill needs and assess how far they can be met from a more open immigration policy for people with those skills.

Social partners should

·        contribute to filling the skills gap, by pursuing a dialogue on the areas such as lifelong learning, skills and information technologies.

The Commission will

·        define the framework within which to develop a Community immigration policy as set out in its recent Communication on the subject.

 

For More Information:  http://europa.eu.int/comm/stockholm_council/it_en.htm


EU

 

3. Mobility; Europe of Knowledge initiative

______________________________________________________________________

Background: As part of the Europe of Knowledge initiative, the mobility of people involved in educational, training, teaching or voluntary activities is becoming an increasingly important aspect of European citizenship as well as a way of integrating people in the labour market and cultural life. The Lisbon European Council invited the Member States, the Council and the Commission to define, by the end of the year 2000, ways of encouraging the mobility of students, teachers and trainers in particular by eliminating barriers and increasing transparency in the recognition of qualifications and periods of study and training. At the Education Council of 9 November 2000, the ministers showed their desire to take concerted action by unanimously adopting a common position on the Recommendation presented by the Commission(1) and adopting the Mobility Action Plan. With a view to bringing about full employment, the Social Agenda approved by the Nice European Council advocates the promotion of a Europe of Knowledge by removing obstacles to the mobility of teachers, researchers, students, trainers and people undergoing training.

 

Objectives: The Recommendation presented by the Commission invites each Member States to do what it can to investigate how obstacles to the mobility of the target groups can be eliminated. It stresses the need to facilitate mobility for everyone, irrespective of one's social circumstances or where one lives, to provide more information of better quality on mobility, to introduce better structured and more appropriate financial assistance for mobility and to improve recognition of the skills or knowledge acquired during periods of mobility. The Mobility Action Plan (MAP) puts the Recommendation into practice. The Action plan provides a set of 42 specific measures to promote mobility such as financial support, mutual system for the academic and professional recognition of qualifications, the involvement of regional authorities, and linguistic and cultural preparation for mobility.

 

Implementation / follow-up: The European Parliament and the Council are due to adopt the Recommendation at the end of May 2001. Since the resolution on the Mobility Action Plan was adopted at the Nice European Council, the Member States have been taking steps to implement those measures which affect them most.

The Commission will regularly assess how the Recommendation and Action Plan are being implemented and will publish a progress report every two years.

 

Timetable: Early/mid February 2001: Second reading in the European Parliament of the proposal for a Recommendation. April/May 2001: Report by the European Parliament (second reading). 28 May 2001: Adoption of the Recommendation by the Education Council. 1st quarter 2003: Progress report on the implementation of the Recommendation and of the Mobility Action Plan.

 

The common position on the Recommendation presented by the Commission can be found at the following address : http://europa.eu.int/scadplus/leg/fr/cha/c11015.htm


EU

 

4. Common European format for curricula vitae

______________________________________________________________________

Background

The Conclusions of the Lisbon European Council call upon the Council and the Commission to develop a common European format for curricula vitae, to be used on a voluntary basis, in order to facilitate mobility by helping the assessment of knowledge acquired, both by education and training establishments and by employers.

Objectives

The European CV is intended to be a tool for individuals and employers which will form part of a coordinated strategy to make qualifications more transparent. It is designed to help people promote their qualifications and skills more effectively in an increasingly integrated labour market.

Implementation / follow-up

In 2001, the Commission will propose a common European format for curricula vitae as requested by the Heads of State at Lisbon. This format will be tested in advance by experts and on a small scale in the Member States.

Timetable

January- March 2001:  Test period for the format devised by the Commission
June 2001:  Format will be finalised
November 2001:  Commission will submit its proposal


EU

 

5. More uniform, transparent and flexible EU regime for recognition of professional qualifications

______________________________________________________________________

Context

It is currently estimated that only 1.25 million people per year take advantage of mobility opportunities and go to work in another Member State (representing 0.6% of the working population) and they are mainly in the 15-29 age range. Greater efforts are needed to strengthen and extend the current work on removing obstacles to mobility and providing for a freer flow of skills between Member States.

Objectives

Current research suggests that many obstacles deter people from actively seeking work in another Member State, one of which is problems involving the recognition of professional qualifications. Greater flexibility is therefore required to allow for more widespread automatic recognition. While the Community legislator needs to continue to act to establish the overall requirements relevant to professional recognition, a variety of means need to be applied to ensure their improved application for the purposes of health, safety, consumer information and protection as well as to ensure clearer and simpler processes of professional recognition.

Implementation / follow-up

The Community needs to develop more flexible ways of ensuring that the general rules laid down in primary legislation are applied in a meaningful way at the working level, taking account of the variety of different methods which may be available and allowing for the continuing development of the practical guarantees which give real effect to the general rule. These requirements produce a need for new flexible means to be introduced to adapt and support the rules currently in place. Regulatory processes, professional standards, transparency of qualifications and recognition procedures have been supported in some areas by private sector standards or platforms. These means need to be applied more flexibly and more vigorously to support the general rules of the system. They are available to provide a range of possible responses to specific requirements and evolving technology and other circumstances. They can provide additional guarantees of transparency, understanding and quality assurance.

Calendar

This issue will be addressed as part of a forthcoming Commission Communication on Flexible Labour Markets.


EU

 

6. Have you got what it takes? Project Gemini – Improving the availability of graduates to the IT services industry

______________________________________________________________________

Scope of Study/Report/Survey and brief summary of findings

Project aims to help improve the availability of graduates to the industry

Bridge the gap between the skills gap in industry and undergraduate skills development

Improve the linkage between employers and educationalists

 

Publication Date / Organization that Conducted Research: May 2000.  Industry / Academia partnership

 

How a Copy of the Study/Report/Survey Can be Obtained (URL, contact):

Summary and press release available: http://www.e-skillsnto.org.uk/pdf-files/hygwit-final.pdf

 

 

Finland

 

1. TIDE (Tietoteollisuuden ja digitaalisen median osaamisen ennakointi)

______________________________________________________________________

Scope/Purpose of Initiative (Include brief summary of project goal)

Purpose of the TIDE initiative is to forecast both quantity and quality of needed skills until 2010 so that the results serve both companies and associations operating in IT sector and as well as education providers.

 

Organizations Involved in Initiative:

TIPAL, FiCom, SET, Satu, Ministry of Education, educational establishments

 

Duration of Initiative: 10/2000 – 12/2001

 

Summaries/Reports Available in these Languages: Not yet available

 

More Information about the Initiative can be Obtained (URL, contact):

Liisa Nakari / TIPAL, liisa.nakari@tipal.fi or tel. +358 9 6220 1001


INDIA

 

1. Special Taskforce on Human Resource Development set up by the Government of India under the Ministry of Human Resource Development

______________________________________________________________________

Scope/Purpose of Initiative (Include brief summary of project goal)

To prepare long-term strategy for significantly increasing the number of well-trained IT professionals. The Task Force will draw a plan to optimally use the existing infrastructure of the IITs, RECs, other engineering colleges and educational institutions to double their student intake from the next academic year and triple it in the next two years. The Task Force comprise Ministers of HRD, IT and Finance, alongwith representatives from State Governments

 

Organizations Involved in Initiative: Ministry of Human Resource Development, Ministry of Information Technology, Ministry of Finance, National Association of Software and Service Companies (NASSCOM)

Summaries/Reports Available in these Languages:  English (when available)

More Information: Contact Dewang Mehta (NASSCOM) AT dewang@nasscom.org

 

 

2. Setting up of Indian Institute of Information Technology (IIIT)

______________________________________________________________________

Scope/Purpose of Initiative (Include brief summary of project goal)

To increase the trained IT workforce in the country. One of the major resource for skilled IT manpower in the country is the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT). There are currently 7 IITs located in the country. In addition, there are many Regional Engineering Colleges. It was felt that with the increasing demand of more skilled IT manpower, there is a need to increase such institutes of skilled IT learning. Therefore, many state governments in India have come forward to set up IIITs.

 

Organizations involved in the initiative:  State Governments of Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Tamil Nadu, Madhya Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh

More information:  www.iiitb.ac.in or contact Dewang Mehta (NASSCOM) at dewang@nasscom.org.


Italy

 

1. Assintel Iniziative

 

Name of Initiative:

Training courses financed by public funds

 

Scope/Purpose of Initiative (Include brief summary of project goal)

Tree months courses plus two months stage each one on a different item (database, networking, software development…) – 20 participants per course

 

Organizations Involved in Initiative: Assintel Iniziative

 

Duration of Initiative: Five months

 

Approximate Funding Amount: US $ 150.000 each

 

Summaries/Reports Available in these Languages: Italian

 

More Information about the Initiative can be Obtained: www.assintel.it

 

 

 

Japan

 

1. Asian Common Skill Standard Initiative for IT Engineers

 

Scope/Purpose

Initiative to develop IT engineers' skills in each Asian countries by establishing common scheme of skill standard.

 

Available in these languages:  Japanese and English

 

How a Copy of the Study Can be Obtained

Contact Junko Kawauchi, JISA at info@jisa.or.jp


Mexico

 

1. Joint Public and Private Committee Review of IT Education

______________________________________________________________________

Scope/Purpose of Initiative

Joint Public and Private Committee to review and to propose changes to the Curricula of the Information Technology careers and related programs of public Universities and Technological High-Schools. To review and to propose changes to the curricula of the Information Technology careers and related programs of public Universities and Technological High-Schools to better adapt to the needs of the Industry of Information Technology.

 

Organizations Involved in Initiative:

Public entities: Economy Secretary, Public Education Secretary, National Bank of Foreign Trade.

Private entities: Mexican Association of Information Technology Industries (AMITI).  

Duration of Initiative:

It is an ongoing work.

Summaries/Reports Available in these Languages

Only internal working papers and internal drafts have been produced.

More Information about the Initiative can be Obtained (URL, contact):

Mr. Rafael Bernal, CEO of Heuristica Sistemas, S. A. de C. V., has been participating in this initiative, among other enthusiast members of AMITI .   Details can be obtained at: rbernal@heuristica.com.mx


Northern Ireland

 

1. Rapid Advancement Programme (RAP)

______________________________________________________________________

Scope/Purpose of Initiative:  To provide IT training and work experience for 250 non-IT graduates per year for 3 years:

Ø      29 week programme (12 week classroom tuition, 12 week work experience with local company working on a development project, 5 week classroom tuition)

Ø      Three training streams.  Trainees chose one of: Software Development (traditional and OO development), Technical Support (networking and systems management), and Emerging Technologies (web based development)

Ø      Currently mid-way through the second year

 

Organizations Involved in Initiative:  Training and Employment Agency (local government agency, part of the Department of Further and Higher Education, Training and Employment; BIC Systems – local training provider; and SIF

Duration of Initiative:  3 Years (currently in year 2)

Summaries/Reports Available in these Languages:  English

More Information: www.bicsystems.com/RAP/Default.htm

 

2. Relevant Experience and Computer Training (REaCT)

______________________________________________________________________

Scope/Purpose of Initiative:  To provide employment and IT training for entry-level staff, typically school leavers without a 3rd level qualification

 

Ø      Over 60 trainees on this programme

Ø      Based on the IT Modern Apprenticeship scheme in the UK run by the e-skills NTO

Ø      2 year programme (trainees have employee status with local employer; training provided by local training organization; work toward National Vocational Qualification at level 2 and 3); work towards MCP qualification

Ø      Two training streams.  Trainees chose one of: Software Development (traditional and OO development); or Technical Support (networking and systems management)

Ø      Currently mid-way through the third year

 

Organizations Involved in Initiative:  Training and Employment Agency (local government agency, part of the Department of Further and Higher Education, Training and Employment; Sx3 – local training provider; and SIF

Duration of Initiative:  Currently in year 2 with no end date to the programme

Approximate Funding Amount:  Approx £8,500 per trainee over the two years (Dependent on the trainee achieving NVQ levels 2 and 3)

Summaries/Reports Available in these Languages   English

More Information:  http://www.sx3.com/training_ITtraining.asp


Northern Ireland

 

3. Business Strategy (BSP) and Business Awareness (BAP) Programmes

______________________________________________________________________

Scope/Purpose of Initiative:  To provide an awareness of business skills to middle and senior managers (the Strategy programme) and to junior staff moving into team leading and junior management roles (the awareness programme)

Ø      One course of each per year with 15 trainees on each programme

Ø      6 one day modules covering

o       strategy (1 day)

o       finance for non finance managers (1 day)

o       marketing (1 day – BSP only)

o       managing people (2 day)

o       managing the development process (1 day)

o       managing the IT project (1 day)

o        leadership (2 day)

 

Organizations Involved in Initiative:  Training and Employment Agency (local government agency, part of the Department of Further and Higher Education, Training and Employment; SIF; and Experts in the fields outlined above

Duration of Initiative:  Seminars are held once a month

Approximate Funding Amount:  Total cost of programme is in the region of £25,000

Summaries/Reports Available in these Languages:  English

More Information about the Initiative can be Obtained: ken@sif.co.uk

 

4. Investors in People – group scheme

______________________________________________________________________

Scope/Purpose of Initiative:  To encourage companies to achieve the Investors in People recognition, a standard in the UK that demonstrates a company’s commitment to staff development.

Ø      7 companies have achieved this standard in the first scheme

Ø      A further 7 are currently working towards the standard.

Ø      Achieved through workshops and consultancy.

Ø       Standard is assess by independent assessor.

 

Organizations Involved in Initiative:  Training and Employment Agency (local government agency, part of the Department of Further and Higher Education, Training and Employment; SIF: and Local consultant

 

Duration of Initiative:  Each scheme lasts about 18 months

Approximate Funding Amount:  £2,000 per company (Some subsidy from the T&EA)

Summaries/Reports Available in these Languages:  English

Contact Ken Frame of the Software Industry Federation (SIF) at Ken@sif.co.uk.


Northern Ireland

 

5. Millennium Leap

______________________________________________________________________

Scope/Purpose of Initiative (Include brief summary of project goal)

To provide IT training for entry-level staff, working towards Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer accreditation.  This programme was aimed at woman returners to work from socially disadvantages areas of Belfast. 

Ø      15 trainees on the programme

Ø      Covers European Computer Driving License

Ø      Working towards Microsoft Certified Professional exams

Ø      18 month programme

o       classroom trainine

o       work experience

o       training allowance and child care facilities were provided

Ø      Programme has completed with a subsequent similar programme due to commence for additional numbers

 

Organizations Involved in Initiative:

Ø      Training and Employment Agency (local government agency, part of the Department of Further and Higher Education, Training and Employment.

Ø      Proteus (European funding body)

Ø      Belfast Unemployed Resource Centre

Duration of Initiative:  18 months

Summaries/Reports Available in these Languages:  English

More Information about the Initiative can be Obtained (URL, contact):

http://www.burc.org/leap/default.htm


Norway

 

1. Rise in education of IT-specialists in Norway

______________________________________________________________________

Scope/Purpose of Initiative (Include brief summary of project goal)

More funds made available for IT-courses both in terms of public and private schooling

"High-school degree in IT", opening up for more funds for bachelor degrees and higher education within IT

 

Organizations Involved in Initiative:  ICT-Norway/ Ministry of Trade and Industry

 

Duration of Initiative:  Long term

 

Summaries/Reports Available in these Languages:  Norwegian

 

More Information about the Initiative can be Obtained (URL, contact):

http://www.odin.dep.no or contact Fredrik Syversen (ICT Norway) at fredrik.syversen@ikt-norge.no.

 

 

2. Opening up of importing IT-specialists from countries outside EU

______________________________________________________________________

Scope/Purpose of Initiative (Include brief summary of project goal)

Lobbying for opening up for importing IT-specialists from countries outside EU

 

Organizations Involved in Initiative:  ICT-Norway/ Ministry of Trade and Industry

 

Duration of Initiative:  Long term

 

Summaries/Reports Available in these Languages:  Norwegian

 

More Information about the Initiative can be Obtained (URL, contact):

http://www.odin.dep.no or contact Fredrik Syversen (ICT Norway) at fredrik.syversen@ikt-norge.no.

 


Singapore

 

1. IDA Manpower Development

______________________________________________________________________

Scope/Purpose of Initiative (Include brief summary of project goal)

Singapore’s Infocomm Development Authority’s (IDA) Manpower Development mission is to attract and develop infocomm manpower and a net-savvy workforce from the pre-employment stage to the in-employment stage to ensure there is a constant pool of skilled infocomm manpower to sustain Singapore's competitive edge in the international arena.  Under the umbrella of the National Manpower Council (NMC) established in line with the Manpower 21 Masterplan, we have formed an industry-driven Infocomm Manpower Committee. This committee will discuss high-level issues and make recommendations to the Government relating to infocomm manpower. It will provide very useful insights from the industry perspective. The Committee is chaired by a key council member of the Singapore Computer Society (SCS) and Singapore IT Federation (SITF), Mr Saw Ken Wye, Managing Director of Microsoft Singapore Pte Ltd. The other committee members are representatives from the industry, including multinational corporations, promising local enterprises, major infocomm-user organisations, as well as local institutes of higher learning and Government bodies. There’s a three-pronged strategy:

 

Strategy I - Enhance an environment to nurture a net-savvy workforce

To enhance the environment to nurture a net-savvy workforce, the Government, together with the industry and institutions of higher learning (IHLs), will cooperate to build a strong setting for our manpower to master the use of information and communications technology for all sectors of the economy. Four initiatives have been developed to build that environment. They include establishing a world-class infocomm education; enhancing the capability of the infocomm manpower; developing a net-savvy workforce; and developing infocomm skills standards.

Strategy II - Attract and retain international talents

IDA will facilitate work pass applications for international infocomm talents to work and stay in Singapore. A separate queue has been set up in Ministry of Manpower to process work pass applications for the infocomm sector and IDA will help manage this queue and give special attention to these Employment Pass applications.

Strategy III - Establish Singapore as the e-Learning hub for the region

Besides benefiting the local workforce, Singapore can extend this e-Learning infrastructure beyond her borders to be the regional hub. One such project is the Virtual Institute to be established by the Institute of Systems Science to provide e-Learning for infocomm professionals and managers, both locally and regionally.

 

Organizations Involved in Initiative:  Singapore’s Infocomm Development Authority’s (IDA)

Summaries/Reports Available in these Languages:  English

More Information: http://www.ida.gov.sg/Website/IDAhome.nsf/Home?OpenForm. Email: manpower@ida.gov.sg  


South Africa

 

 

1. Skills Development Act and Skills Development Levies Act

______________________________________________________________________

Scope/Purpose of Initiative:

To implement a payroll levy and direct the funds to training initiatives designed to address identified priority needs by sector. Involves employer bodies and labor organizations, managed within framework set up by Depts. of Labor and Education.

 

Brief summary of project goal:  Information Systems, Electronics & Telecommunications Technologies Sector Education & Training Authority (ISETT SETA)

 

Duration of Initiative:  Ongoing from 2000

 

Approximate Funding Amount:  $12million+ per annum for the ICT sector

 

Summaries/Reports Available in these Languages:  English

 

More Information:  See reports in English at www.isett.org.za


Sweden

 

1. SwIT – Training for Jobs in IT; a Platform for Growth

______________________________________________________________________

Scope of Study/Report/Survey:

SwIT is a project which has been run for 2 years where the Swedish IT-companies' Organisation (SITO) actually trained nearly 12,000 unemployed people to become IT-technicians. It is described as a very successful project.

 

Brief summary of findings: SwIT-vocational training (Sweden Information Technology) has been able to provide 10,000 of the nearly 12,000 trained IT specialists employment in more than 3,000 companies. SwIT started at a time of high unemployment and concluded at a time when the need for competence and know-how in the field was greater than ever. The idea that the business community should take the initiative in ensuring an adequate future supply of qualified personnel was a new and unconventional approach in the field of labor market training. It entailed assuming responsibility for specifying the right training, and selecting the right participants for the right employers at the right time. All of this in a field (IT) that is a constant state of flux. The number of study programs increased from 12 at the start to 112 by the end, while the number of recruiting companies rose from an initially estimated 300 to in excess of 3,000 – by far most of which were not actually from the IT sector. The project was based on a “classic” labor market policy, where the goal was to solve a bottleneck situation in industry by means of labor market training. This goal was achieved. In the bargain, a model had been created for future projects which could work in a constantly changing labor market with high demands on flexibility.

 

Two months after the conclusion of the project, 82 percent had received job offers. This figure was expected to rise due to the great demand for trained IT personnel. Finally, the project could be seen as a test of the importance of trusting cooperation between the business community and the government. The government responded to the demands of the business community for a targeted recruitment training program and gave them the trust and financial resources to implement it. The government also allowed the interests of the business community by giving it priority when determining the content and execution of the project. Both sides won. But those who won the most were the course participants and the companies that employed them.

 

Organization that Conducted Research:  Swedish IT-companies' Organisation (SITO), Federation of Swedish Industries, Ministry of Industry and Trade, National Audit Office.

 

Date of Publication:  Duration: January 1998 – February 2000.

Approximate Funding Amount:  The costs of training an unemployed person to match a job offer amounted to SEK95,000, of which SEK60,000 were pure training costs.

Available in these Languages:  Swedish and English.

Get a Copy: Contact Project Leader Ewa Thorslund (SITO) at ewa.thorslund@itforetagen.se


UK

 

1. E-skills NTO strategic plan

______________________________________________________________________

Scope of Study/Report/Survey and brief summary of findings: This strategic plan is created by and for employers with an interest in IT skills. It is also written for those who wish to help industry succeed in the 21st century – the Government, the educators and others who recognize that the increasing shortage of IT skills is a primary threat to UK economic development. It provides a vehicle for uniting interested parties around a common set of priorities. The objective is focused, decisive action to deliver maximum benefit to the economy. The strategic framework herein caters for national, regional and local interests, based on the needs of the primary stakeholders and beneficiaries. It is hoped that this document will inspire the reader to take action. Attacking common priorities, and working together, employers, Government and educators can place the UK at the forefront of international business in the Information Age

 

Publication Date / Organization that Conducted Research:

Draft plan, February 2001.  E-skills NTO. The e-skills NTO is formally recognised by Government as "The National Training Organisation for the Information Age", with responsibility for the IT industry and IT skills.

Available in these Languages:  English.

More Information: http://www.e-skillsnto.org.uk/consultation/index.html

 

2. Skills Framework for the Information Age

______________________________________________________________________

Scope/Purpose of Initiative: SFIA embraces skills needs of an organization by providing a simple but elegant "lightweight" matrix of skills descriptors organized into seven levels of accountability; follow, assist, apply, enable, advise, initiate/influence, strategy/inspire/mobilize. There are six major categories of activity; Strategy & planning, Management & Administration, Sales & Marketing, Development & Implementation, Service Delivery and Use. The categories are further subdivided and the matrix contains 71 detailed Skills Descriptors where accountability and category present a populated intersect on the matrix. Organizations Involved in Initiative:

·         Information Systems suppliers: EDS, Microsoft, IBM, Oracle

·         Users: the Post Office, Norwich Union, Reading Borough Council, Ministry of Defence

·         Industry Associations: AISS (Alliance for Information Systems Skills), BCS (British Computer Society), IMIS (Institute for the Management of Information Systems), IEE (Institution of Electrical Engineers), CSSA (Computing Services & Software Association), and others.

·         Government and its agencies, DfEE (Department for Education & Employment), DTI (Department of Trade & Industry), MOD (Ministry Of Defence) and CCTA (Central Computer & Telecommunications Agency)

Summaries/Reports Available in these Languages:  English.

More Information: www.sfia.org.uk


UK

 

3. E-skills into Business

______________________________________________________________________

Scope/Purpose of Initiative (Include brief summary of project goal)

The aim of the project is to develop a leading edge programme to address ICT skill needs in SMEs within the south east region: owners, managers and members of the workforce employed in SMEs. SEEDA (the South East of England Development Agency) has rightly identified that SMEs are often inexpert purchasers and implementers of new technologies, particularly ICT. Yet they need to become competent if they are to successfully innovate, compete and grow through, for example, the adoption of e-commerce.

 

Organizations Involved in Initiative:

The project is a partner to the government’s UK On Line for Business programme.

Partners and curriculum contributors include: Energis (providing a world class e-portal built for small businesses), M2S, Toshiba, EDS, BT, Danish Technology Institute, Skillserver, Institute of Directors, CSSA (Computing Services & Sopftware Association), Professor Hepworth of the Local Futures Group, Professor Anne Jones, Communications Management Association (CMA), BCS (British Computer Society), ICTMB, University of Surrey, All South East England Business Links, the South East Chambers of Commerce, Isle of Wight Partnership, TEC National Council, ITTA (USA), webevaluate.com (USA), Interco, Informatics CTEC, Prince plc, the Courseware Company, Corporate Learning and Global Training Solutions.

 

Summaries/Reports Available in these Languages:  English.

More Information: www.esib.co.uk

 

4. CSSA Skills Advisory Board

______________________________________________________________________

Scope/Purpose of Initiative (Include brief summary of project goal)

Group of CSSA members who co-ordinate the work done in this area by the association and comment on and feed into other initiatives.  Will be driving the lobbying effort to get tax breaks for companies and individuals wishing to invest in IT training

 

Organizations Involved in Initiative:  Members of the Computing Services & Software Association (CSSA )

Summaries/Reports Available in these Languages:  English.

Minutes and agendas available by contacting Laurence Harrison at Laurence.Harrison@cssa.co.uk.


UK

 

5. Employers charter

______________________________________________________________________

Scope of initiative

Employers produced the Charter in response to research published by the e-skills NTO, which showed that the skills shortage could be eased by addressing the poor image of IT, broadening recruitment into the industry and by increasing the provision of work experience placements.

 

IBM, Logica, Microsoft, EDS, Intel, Ericsson, Nortel and ARM are just some of the names that have signed up to the Charter, committing them to working with the e-skills NTO to take action to fight the growing shortage of IT professionals. The employers urge those not already committed to work with them.

 

Publication Date / Organization that Conducted Research:

March 2001. E-skills NTO. The e-skills NTO is formally recognized by Government as "The National Training Organization for the Information Age", with responsibility for the IT industry and IT skills.

 

IBM, Logica, Microsoft, EDS, Intel, Ericsson, Nortel and ARM are just some of the names that have signed up to the Charter, committing them to working with the e-skills NTO to take action to fight the growing shortage of IT professionals. The employers urge those not already committed to work with them.

 

Available in these Languages:  English.

How a Copy of the Study/Report/Survey Can be Obtained (URL, contact):

http://www.e-skillsnto.org.uk/news/charter.html


USA

 

1. The National Skills Standard Board

______________________________________________________________________

Scope of Study/Report/Survey and brief summary of findings

The National Skill Standards Board (NSSB) is building a voluntary national system of skill standards, assessments and certifications that will enhance the ability of the U.S. workforce to compete in global and digital economies.

 

Skill standards development is nearing completion in two important sectors - manufacturing and the retail/wholesale industries.  The Manufacturing Skill Standards Council (MSSC) and the Sales & Service Voluntary Partnership, Inc. (S&SVP), plan to complete initial standards development in their respective industries this year.  On October 1, 1999, the education and training convening group was recognized as the Education and Training Voluntary Partnership (E&TVP), which plans to release skill standards in 2001.  In January of this year, the Utility Industry Group (UIG) was created to begin the development of skill standards in the utility industry.  Finally on May 16, 2000, the NSSB recognized the Hospitality and Tourism Industry Coalition as the organization’s fourth Voluntary Partnership.  Coalition building efforts continue for the finance and insurance, business and administrative services, and telecommunications industry sectors. 

 

Organization that Conducted Research: Industry coalitions in IT, telecommunications, manufacturing, retail, mining, hospitality, finance, and utilities. The National Skill Standards Board (NSSB) - an unprecedented coalition of leaders from business, labor, employee, education, and community and civil rights organizations created in 1994 to build a voluntary national system of skill standards, assessment and certification systems to enhance the ability of the United States workforce to compete effectively in a global economy. 

Approximate Funding Amount:  Funded by Congress through at least 2002.

Available in these Languages:  English

How a Copy of the Study/Report/Survey Can be Obtained (URL, contact): http://www.nssb.org/


USA

 

2. The Techforce Initiative

______________________________________________________________________

Scope of Study/Report/Survey and brief summary of findings

Implementing a nationwide program to engage IT employees in school-to-careers, funded by the National School to Work Office, in partnership with the National Alliance of Business and Education Development Center. The IT sector is facing a severe shortage of workers. According to ITAA's Bridging the Gap:  IT Skills in the New Millennium study (April 2000) 846,000 positions in the IT sector will likely go unfilled this year. To address this need, increasing numbers of IT employers are establishing school-to-career (STC) or school-to-work (STW) partnerships with schools, K-20, to help prepare the future workforce for entry into IT careers. Key activities include:

 

 

Through these activities, ITAA, NAB and EDC intend to:

 

Organization that Conducted Research:

National Alliance of Business (NAB), Information Technology Association of America (ITAA), and Education Development Center, Inc. (EDC)

Dates of duration: From 1999 to October 2001.

Available in these Languages: English

For further information, see: http://www.itaa.org/workforce/.


USA

 

3. The Career Cluster Initiative

______________________________________________________________________

Scope of Study/Report/Survey and brief summary of findings

Assisting ion the development of an IT career cluster model, as a partner of the Education Development Center, the Information Technology Association of America (ITAA) provides leadership and IT related expertise to curriculum, test piloted at nine sites nationwide.  Products of the initiative will include:

 

o        A national model and framework defining the Information Technology Career Cluster.
View the IT Career Cluster Model (Microsoft PowerPoint file).
An IT Occupational Framework (Adobe Acrobat file).
Download the free Acrobat Reader.

o        A common language used in the academic and technical communities to describe the IT skills all learners need for learning and for working, and the specialized IT skills some learners need for working in the IT industry.

o        Compendia of vocational and academic curricula and existing certifications that are mapped to the IT Career Cluster Model and Framework.
View Resource Guide(Adobe Acrobat file).
Download the free Acrobat Reader.

o        A package of implementation tools, record keeping and assessment strategies to ensure standards-based learning and to measure and document student progress.

o        Nine demonstration sites modeling the IT career cluster and sharing implementation and assessment strategies.

 

Organization that Conducted Research: Education Development Center, Information Technology Association of America (ITAA), National Alliance of Business (NAB).

Dates of duration: Through 2001 (This is a two phase project: Phase I: October,1999 to December, 2000. Phase II: January, 2001 to June 2002).

Available in these Languages:  English

For further information, see http://www.edc.org/EWIT/